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tv   The Place for Politics 2016  MSNBC  February 19, 2016 6:00am-2:01pm PST

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good morning from columbia, south carolina. the state capital. the home of the university of south carolina. soda city they call it. i'm steve kornacki with msnbc's special coverage of the south carolina republican primary and the nevada democratic caucuses. also this hour we are going to be going to washington for the start of what will be two days of ceremonies and tributes in honor of the late justice antonin scalia, the motorcade carrying his casket to the supreme court is expected to leave shortly. we will bring you that when it happens. but first with less than 24 hours to go now until those first votes are cast here in the palmetto state, a brand new poll out this morning shows ted cruz suddenly within striking distance of donald trump in the fight for first place here. take a look. it is our new nbc news "wall street journal" marist poll, it shows donald trump still ahead, but look at that, an 8 point drop in just the last month in this poll.
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ted cruz mean while inching up now within five points, 28 to 23. a month ago that was a 16-point lead for donald trump in this poll. that said, there are other polls that show a more commanding lead in the state for donald trump. arg's poll shows rubio solidly in second place here in south carolina, also has john kasich up in third but kasich is dead last in a new fox news poll of the state. donald trump again leading comfortably by 13 points in that poll. now, this state, south carolina, is famous for its late deciding voters and for last minute momentum. this is a place where just four years ago at this time newt gingrich surged almost 30 points in the final days to score is decisive upset victory over mitt romney. so is trump's lead vanishing before our eyes or is he going to have no trouble holding off his vie valls? again, the voting starts less than 24 hours from now. trump at a town hall event last night still depending off
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questions about his couldn't veshlt comments about whether george w. bush lied the country into with aer with iraq. >> you would not say again that george w. bush lied. >> i don't know. i can't tell you. i'd have to look at some documents. >> and trump also confronted last night with a 2002 interview with howard stern. in that interview trump said he was in favor of invading iraq. trump of course has been claiming that he opposed the iraq war from the beginning. >> do you remember saying that? >> no, but, i mean, i could have said that. nobody asked me -- i wasn't a politician. it was probably the first time anybody asked me that question, but by the time the war started, that was quite a bit before -- >> yeah, this was 2002. >> by the time the war started i was against the war and there are articles, i mean, there are headlines in 2003, 2004 that i was totally against the word and a couple of people in your two recalled in terms of the pundits said there's definite proof in 2003, 2004 trump was against
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this. and now today another frantic day of campaigning for all the republican candidates in south carolina. this hour alone we are expecting to hear from ted cruz, marco rubio, jeb bush and also jeb's mother barbara along with john kasich. on the democratic side hillary clinton and bernie sanders sharpened their jabs last night at the msnbc telemundo town hall in las vegas with clinton slamming sanders over his criticism of presidents obama and clinton. >> i just don't know where all this comes from because maybe it's that senator sanders wasn't really a democrat until he decided to run for president. he doesn't even know what -- you know, last two democratic presidents did. and i'm -- you know i'm -- well, it's true. it's true. you know it's true. i mean, it happens to be true. >> i happen to think bill clinton did a pretty good job as president, but let's be clear. i happen to think that our trade agreements from nafta through
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tpp have been a disaster. >> and now we have new national polling in this democratic race just out this morning. the nbc news "wall street journal" poll shows a tightening race nationally since bernie sanders' big win in new hampshire, the hillary clinton lead now 11 points over bernie sanders. it was much bigger a month ago. clinton and sanders are both going to spend today campaigning in nevada ahead of tomorrow's first in the west caucuses. we have three reports for you this morning, kristen welker is live in las vegas and here with me in south carolina we have hallie jackson as well as katy tur on the phone. kissen welker, the democrats getting together last night, that's their final -- it wasn't a head to heat meeting, they weren't on stage at the same time but they still had some sharp words for each other. >> they did. they might as well been on stage at the same time, steve. they had some of their sharpest exchanges yet, everything from who is more loyal to president obama as you just laid to
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healthcare. also immigration. it was interesting, though, both candidates vowing to make immigration a top priority, secretary clinton going even further and saying she would address it within her first 100 days in office if elected. some of the toughest questions came from the audience members, steve, including one person who asked secretary clinton again to release her transcripts from those speeches that she delivered to goldman sachs. take a listen to what that exchange. >> why are you hesitant to release transcripts or audio video recordings of those meetings in order to be transparent with the american people regarding the promises and assurances that you have had made to the big banks? >> well, let me say this -- i -- i am happy to release anything i have when everybody else does the same because every other candidate in this race has given speeches to private groups including senator sanders. >> so pivoting there a little
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bit. one of the more notable and lighter exchanges came when senator sanders was asked if he's a feminist. >> i consider myself a strong feminist. and, in fact, gloria steinem, everybody knows gloria was one of the leading feminists in america made me an honorary woman many, many years ago. i don't know exactly what that meant, but i accepted it when she came to campaign for me. >> so senator sanders getting a few laughs there, but of course courting the all important women's vote. both candidates have been reaching out to union members here, steve, making some unpreviously -- unplanned stops to meet with members of unions here in nevada, of course, that is a critical voting block here. secretary clinton also paying an unscheduled visit to britney spears. take a look at this. this is the type of visit that could help her with those millennials. it is a tight race here in nevada, steve, according to the
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latest polling, secretary clinton leads but only by 1 point. so turnout is going to be critical and if you have millennials turning out in force that could benefit senator sanders, but it is going to be down to the wire here. steve. >> the britney spears factor in the nevada caucuses, there we go. kristen welker, thank you for that. we will be talking much more about the week ahead here in south carolina for the democrats. they will be coming here as soon as nevada is over. we will get to all that in just a moment. but right now the republicans and hallie jackson is with me here in the liberty tap room before heading out to join ted cruz on the campaign trail. this new poll this morning, ted cruz, this feels -- look, we've seen polls all over the place, maybe donald trump still has a commanding lead, but i'm starting to think back to iowa a little bit, donald trump had the lead ahead of time and ted cruz was the late closer there. >> and ted cruz played that expectations game so well in iowa. they saw there was a period of time in january where cruz it looked like he was going to romp
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by double digits, he got a lot of momentum out of iowa and that was a lot of the conversation. the cruz campaign will tell you they believe they will overperform where their polling shows they are right now. there's not a sense necessarily that they could fully close the gap given how dominant we've seen donald trump in some of these other polls. they're punching up at donald trump not just here in south carolina but in nevada as well, they have this new ad out talking about federal lands, seems to be aimed at that libertarian vote out of nevada. here in south carolina they're running that ad against marco rubio on his immigration position, the one that splices -- >> we actually -- we have a cut of that. i think we can play that. this is that ad. >> rubio got to washington and wrote the bill giving amnesty to illegals using obama's talking points to make his tales pitch. >> we know we have to deal with the 11 million people that are here illegally. >> we have to deal with the 11 million individuals who are here illegally. the bill that senator rubio put forward i think is a great place
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to start. >> so rubio's vulnerability kpeeps st seems to be immigration. it's what you hear when you go out to events and talk to supporters, even supporters of marco rubio's. you look at how he might try to pick up momentum coming out of his fifth place finish in n had, he needs something strong in south carolina to carry him into nevada but i would point out in the poll, jeb bush is up and john kasich is up, too. so kasich is somebody who is not going anywhere. he is looking ahead to michigan, looking head to some of those midwestern and northeastern states, too, not necessarily south carolina. one of our colleagues said it this morning, this is the most exciting day in politics since yesterday. every day it's something new. >> there is still that clutter. talk about pressure for marco rubio with the endorsement of nikki haley with all the support he has in this state if he doesn't poll out second place you have you have request he is to answer. >> nikki haley one of the most popular politicians in the
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state. so marco rubio, you know, there is a lot of pressure on him moving forward into tomorrow. >> if he does not do well we might look back at that ad and say that was devastating for him. hallie jackson, good luck today on the trail with ted cruz. let's go to nbc's katy tur, she is on the phone, on the road heading from charleston to myrtle beach for a noontime donald trump rally at an indoor sports facility. katy tur, we played those clips from last night from the town hall. donald trump still answering questions about his comments about george w. bush, still answering questions about the iraq war. we have this new poll this morning suggesting maybe this thing is tight thing a lot down here. is he maybe paying a auto price for what he said in that debate? >> i think that certainly could be the case. we're seeing this new nbc news "wall street journal" poll which shows him only 5 points ahead of ted cruz which is a massive drop. he was 16 points ahead of him last night. this could be an outlier poll, all of those other polls are showing him with a great lead here in south carolina, but the
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donald trump campaign could potentially be hurting from not condemning the pope necessarily but going to war with george w. bush over his decisions after 9/11, his decision to invade iraq. donald trump has said over and over and over again on the campaign trail that he was against the invasion of iraq. now we're hearing 2002 interview from howard stern saying that he was for the invasion, he is saying now that he changed his mind later and he was against it before we actually went into iraq, but these sort of things could potentially be hurting him. i've spoken to people within the campaign who say that they told him to back off the george w. bush attacks. they said it wasn't necessarily playing well. george w. bush still very popular here in south carolina, his brother may not be that popular, but he himself, the former president, still beloved within this state. i spoke to people within the campaign, they said even the volunteers at the phone banks were telling donald trump to back off because they were hearing push back from many of the people that they were
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calling. steve. >> all right. katy tur on her way to myrtle beach to meet up with donald trump. and there is a lot more political news to get to this morning including new remarks last night from former new york mayor michael boom berg, a lot of talk as to whether he will make a late entry as an independent into the 20616 race. first let me bring in jack kuenzie and jessica taylor a digital political reporter at npr. >> let me put up first this is the front page of "the state" they are expecting record turn out in this republican primary. also we could also say at the -- below the fold msnbc's own craig melvin, that's him in this bar. so let's talk about where this race stands, jack, heading into saturday. we have this new poll that shows donald trump's lead may be closing just 5 points, maybe some momentum behind ted cruz. the finding inside that poll that jumped out at me was voters who call themselves very
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conservative suddenly seem to be breaking to ted cruz. >> well, this squares up with what i was hearing from a lot of our local republican operatives over the last couple of days. that this race was tightening up and what we were seeing, especially from the national polls, was not necessarily indicative of what was happening here on the ground. and then in fact that there was some is that linkage of that gap, that double digit gap between, you know, the front runner and sort of the pack behind him. i think that's been played out now in the polling from nbc and the wall stre"wall street jour. >> a parade of newspaper front pages but this is charleston, this is the front page, it says haley and rubio they're asking is this the face of the republican party. there are a lot of republicans i know in washington who would like this to be the face of the republican party, but this new poll if marco rubio getting nikki haley's endorsement, getting the support of tim scott the senator here, getting the support of trey gowdy the congressman from the upstate, if
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he has all of that and he can't beat ted cruz for second place that says something about his campaign. >> that's what the cruz campaign has been pushing. maybe this came too late. i don't know if maybe the poll doesn't capture all of that, we'll see what comes on saturday. maybe it doesn't capture some of that late momentum that the rubio really feels like they are getting and seems to -- by some of the rubio campaigns comments seems to be capturing in their own polling and stuff, too. i would agree with what jack said, i was with the cruz campaign on wednesday in upstate which is very conservative, very evangelical, he was speaking at a church in spartanburg and a lot of people i was talking to were torn between trump and cruz originally but they held cruz -- he speaks their language and their faith and a lot of them said i like how tough donald trump is but some of the things he has said in the last few days has turned him off and particularly him hitting george bush. i think it may have pushed some of those more conservative
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voters toward ted cruz in the last -- >> jackie, it was striking i was watching this exchange at that town hall featuring donald trump and he was asked point-blank by somebody in the audience do you think that george w. bush actually lied the country into war with iraq and he would not give a yes or no answer. he really didn't want to go there anymore. >> yeah, and i think that -- i think people are starting to perceive that maybe that, you know, donald trump for all of his political skills and he has amazing political skills for a guy who wasn't in the system prior to this time does from time to time give you these sort of answers that don't necessarily answer the question. i think that they're seeing that his reluctance to address that issue head on it's sort of, you know, kind of classic political, you know, swi rk, squirming aro. i wonder if they see this is a candidate here who always tells it like it is. >> it's interesting. we always talk about in every state but late deciding voters
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that was such a story four years ago with newt gingrich making that surge. saturday night when these returns start coming in tell us for outsiders who know only vaguely south carolina geography where are you looking? what is going to tell you who is winning this election saturday night? >> for the cruz campaign they will be definitely looking to the upstate. that's the power base for evangelical voters. he has been actively courting the evangelical, the born again vote, especially in that region of the state, it's the most conservative portion of south carolina. and, you know, his organization here has worked very hard to line up evangelical pastors, they have a fairly significant group or network of evangelical pastors that have been on their side and i think they will be looking for some strength up there. the rest of the state is a little harder to pin down. you have libertarian more moderate voters down in the low country, we have here in the mid lands significant military
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resources, we have shaw air force base and mcentire and we have a lot of veterans here, a lot of people who are very, very loyal to the military. so it is a -- basically a three-part state when it comes to where those alliances come from and i think that -- but definitely for cruz he's looking to win that born again vote. >> all right. we will see how that comes in. tomorrow night the polls close and we will actually find out what this all meant for the last week. thanks for joining us. coming up we will take a break from the campaign trail and we are going to remember the late supreme court justice antonin scalia. the motorcade carrying his casket it is due to arrive at the supreme court any minute now. he will lie in repose in the great hall there. chris jansing and pete williams are outside the supreme court, they will join us next. i think we should've taken a left at the river. tarzan know where tarzan go! tarzan does not know where tarzan go. hey, excuse me, do you know where the waterfall is?
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welcome back live from columbia, south carolina. let's go now to washington where the casket carrying justice antonin scalia should arrive at the supreme court any minute now. nbc's chris jansing is there and picks up our coverage live. chris. >> as you know the longest serving justice currently on the court who died in texas, someone who changed the court. certainly changed the way that intellectual conservative thought was approached on the court. changed oral arguments. he loved to spar. changed the way written opinions were given. many people read them who weren't lawyers, read them just for enjoyment. right now the crowds have gathered waiting for the motorcade carrying his casket to arrive at the supreme court. it will be carried into the court by court police. you see the comment and former justices who are waiting just outside the court on the steps. justice scalia's body will be
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placed on the lincoln cat at that folk. we just learned that the ceremony will be led by scalia's son who is also lead his funeral mass tomorrow and the public will be able to pay their respects this morning. the president and first lady will be among them later in the day. joining me right now msnbc's chief legal cress poend ent ari melber, with me at the base of the steps at the supreme court nbc justice correspondent pete williams. hard to argue one of the most influential members of the court of the last quarter century, certainly the most influential conservative. >> certainly the most outspoken conservative. whether he was the most conservative on some cases yes, some no, but this is quite a scene her. this is a very somber scene. 98 of justice scalia's former
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law clerks, remember he was here nearly 30 years so he had over 100 law clerks, 98 of them are now on the steps of the supreme court leading up to the mag any dent great hall which is just inside the bronze doors at the top of the steps and across the street -- if you are not familiar with washington, d.c. the supreme court building is directly across the street from the u.s. capital, people are lined up waiting for their turn. the justices will be inside. when the casket is carried in there will be a brief prayer service. paul scalia will be saying the prayer and mass tomorrow. among the law clerks are two judges, paul clement, jeffrey sutton and joan larson who was just put on the supreme court of michigan last fall, but you see the former clerks there now lined up.
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eight supreme court police officers there just at the end of the plaza with the capital building on the other side of the street and it's through that column that the casket will be married up to the supreme court's great hall. this ceremony is something that was familiar to justice scalia because it in 2005 there was a similar lying in repose ceremony for chief justice william rehnquist and at that time he was present and escorted president and mrs. bush as they came to pay their respects. president obama as you know, chris, will be here later today. we don't know who will have the honor of escorting the president, but it's right up through those two columns of people that the court's great hall is the space between that ceremonial entrance to the building and then the supreme court chamber which lies beyond the great hall, chris. >> among them as you pointed out notesable former clerks but also liberal former clerks. one of the things that he will be remembered for is that he
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loved that back and forth and so much has been made since his death of his friendship with justice ruth bader ginsburg and she loved him for just that reason. >> well, that's right. >> that they would have that back and forth and they could agree to disagree, but have an intellectual back and forth. >> he loved the intellectual battle. you see, by the way, father paul scalia there in his vestments. >> one of his nine children. >> all nine children will be here today along with justice scalia's wife maureen. they will be inside for the brief ceremony that will precede the court's doors opening to the public and then the justice will lie in repose the rest of the day and then the funeral tomorrow here in washington as well. >> his son paul will be an owe fish yant, i believe and i saw conflicting reports on this, he has 36 grandchildren. >> yes, that's right. >> he is a deaf vote roman catholic. went to sunday mass, latin mass, pre vatican two and also was
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known for afterwards going sometimes to have coffee and doughnuts and just hanging out and talking to people as long as it wasn't about any current case that was in front of the court. he has a personality -- had a personality, frankly, that was so engaging that he did earn friends on both sides of the aisle. >> i'm not sure we can be completely confident that he never confined his discussions to cases that were not before the court. >> there was a famous controversy involving a vice president as i recall. >> that's right, more than one famous controversy where he got in trouble for comments that he made before cases were heard, but you're right, he loved that intellectual give and take. he loved to be, for example, invited to ceremonies by the american civil liberties union where he would get in discussions. now we see the honorary pallbearers who are being lady out by the supreme court honor guard. these are, again, members of the supreme court police force that are the honor guard.
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these are the honorary pallbearers who are going down now between the two columns of former clerks but the honorary pallbearers are former clerks so it's very much just u. justice scalia day here at the court. >> you remarked on the last time it happened which was for the former chief justice in 2005 when his casket was actually met by his fill low members on the court, that is not the case today, they are inside perhaps allowing for the cold which has not stopped the crowd from gathering here, but it is a very chilly washington day here. >> you wouldn't know that by the police officers and the clerks standing there without their overcoats, but it is a chilly day here. now, the hearse is just arriving, the street has been blocked off and the members of the honor guard are approaching it along with the honorary pallbearers.
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>> ari melber, let me bring you in, are you on the other side of the street among the crowd? >> that's right, chris. i'm on first street right now, we are watching as pete mentioned the hearse arriving, it is obviously solemn and quiet here, we have plenty of members of the press but also members of the public who are watching this procession begin. chris. >> as we wait for this ceremony to begin it may surprise a lot of people to know that the supreme court didn't always have its own building. this is so iconic now, it wasn't until 1935. it's 146th year of existence that it did. before that it was in a variety of locations. >> before that, just before it came across the street, it used to meet in the basement of the u.s. capitol. if you go to visit the capitol you can still see that original supreme court chamber. when the supreme court was first
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founded the justices met wherever they could, they met in a tavern, which is why still today you hear at the beginning of the supreme court term a rather odd announcement by the marshall all persons having business before the court are admonished to draw near and give their attention because the court is now sitting. >> it's worth noting that justice scalia was confirmed in what was a very different era, 98-0, something he commented on on a number of occasions. >> endlessly. >> on a number of occasions. >> and he would also point out that the two votes that weren't there were just senators who were on sent that would have voted for him anyway. >> joe biden who will be at the funeral tomorrow was a senator then. he said that was the vote he most regretted as a senator because scalia was so effective and no one could doubt that he certainly pushed forward a school of thought, an interpretation of the constitution pete called originalism. >> these are now eight members
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of the u.s. supreme court police force who are acting as the pallbearers and they are there are 12 honorary pallbearers all of whom are former law clerks of justice scalia and they will follow the casket as it is brought now on the sidewalk and then up to the supreme court's plaza, the small number of steps here and then up to those series of big ceremonial marble steps that lead up to the capitol -- to the us supreme court's magnificent bronze doors. >> 16 marble columns at the top of those stairs at the front entrance and that famous phrase is inscribed there, equal justice under the law. those bronze doors each weighing about 6.5 tons. door panels strul presidented by john donnelly, jr., they show historic scenes in the development of the law. then they go go into that courtroom known as the great hall and where he will lie in
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repose on that kcatafalque. the busts of all the former key justices, on marble pedestals along those side walls and they are decorated on the sides with medallion profiles of lawyers. huge imposing place where he will lie in row pose, pete. >> there's something, i think, that's rather touching about the time here because the supreme court was very prompt at always doing things at a certain time. the court would always come into session when the justices were on the bench at 10:00 a.m. so the justices would arrive here in the court building just before then and that will be the case again today. as antonin scalia returns to this place where he served for 35 years -- 30 years, rather, roughly 30 years, actually 29 years and five months and was looking at the data just
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yesterday, i think that makes him the 15th longest serving justice out of the 110 or so justices in u.s. history. >> he was not often somber. he was someone who seemed somewhat ear repressable often, his writing could be very entertaining. the arguments you saw him do in front of -- while he sat in that chamber often should we say energetic. >> he was one of the most energetic as you say, fiery participants in oral argument and when he came here almost 30 years ago he was one of the justices who helped change this to what they call a hot bench meaning the lawyers who come here to argue before the supreme court barely get a word out before they begin to get peppered with questions. now the pallbearers are carrying justice scalia's casket through the cordon of former clerks who
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have served here, each justice has clerks that serve with them for one supreme court term, it's a coveted position and they get to work with the justices very closely. so each of these people that you see that justice scalia's casket is passing are people who knew him well and the justices tend to keep in touch with their clerks throughout the years. it's not an in and out kind of thing, there are frequent reunions that the clerks organize and they have a very close personal relationship. it's really unlike i would say any other kind of apprenticeship, if you will, in washington. it's really an old tradition, an honored tradition in the judiciary and it's a lifelong relationship really between the clerks and the justices they serve. >> and waiting at the top of those stairs as we pointed out before is his son, paul. he came from an era, justice
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scalia did, where there were large catholic families and where in many of those families they hoped to have someone enter a religious order. he always said that he didn't spend a lot of time with his children when they were young, but he was very proud of them. i think it was paul actually who may have told the story and probably some of his other children about for the longest time they were not allowed to wear as they put it blue jeans that their father was someone who felt that they needed to go to school and look more appropriate and he said he used to talk to them the way that his own parents had talked to him about the rules of behavior and that just because other people did things a certain way didn't mean that that was how it should be done. i think that's something that in some ways married over into many of his knew dishl arguments. >> now we're looking at the view from inside the supreme court
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building, just inside those doors. the supreme court's great hall, the marble space that separates those doors from the supreme court courtroom which would be from this perspective behind the camera and you see the pallbearers now bringing in the casket. what's going to happen next is a private ceremony, private in the sense that the public will not be in the great hall at that point. there will be a prayer that will be offered by father paul scalia who you just see walking out of the frame there now, one of justice scalia's nine children who are there inside the great hall along with the justices' wife maureen and also a former justice david suitor who retired from the court just a few years ago, he will be here today -- you see justice briar, justice thomas, you see the other members of the court. >> elena kagan.
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>> they are actually lined up in the order in which they would be seated at the supreme court bench. and of course justice scalia was the senior associate justice, the chief justice always sits in the middle by tradition and is considered the most senior member of the court but then the others are in alternating back and forth order sitting next to the chief and justice scalia had that seat just to the chief justices right and that's the same way the justices are arranged. you see justice sonja sotomayor just to the right of the frame and justice thomas, justice briar, justice roberts, chief justice roberts just to the left of the u.s. flag there all waiting for this short private ceremony, private in the sense that only -- the public is not admitted but we will be able to see it and father scalia will read a prayer and do a brief reading. >> another former justice, john paul stevens is, is not here
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today but we're told he will be at the funeral tomorrow. >> you mentioned the closeness of many of his former clerks. when you think about the decades that some of them have served together, the many years and the close friendships that have formed, this is a very difficult day for those members of the supreme court as we see in the middle of your picture ruth bader ginsburg with whom he shared a love of opera. >> right. >> they famously were seen on elephants riding together. >> and justice kennedy to the right as we see them and then justice samuel alito and justice elena kagan all in the -- all in the order in which they would be seated at the bench. this is a place where seniority matters so everything is done strictly by that. >> another close friend of his, elena kagan who talks about when she was going through her confirmation and going through congress and she was asked so many times about the second amendment and she was asked if she had a gun or ever shot a gun and she said i was born on the
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upper east side, i grew up on the upper east side of manhattan. so when she was confirmed and came to the court it was indeed antonin scalia who took her shooting and they used to go out sometimes several times a year. >> went to my home state of wyoming and did some hunting as well. quite a change for her. but she was determined to hit it off well with justice scalia and they did. he was that kind of a person. i should say that justices -- some of the justices spouses and family members are with them as well today that you see on the other side of the casket. >>catafalque. . >> in the name of the father and of the son and of the holey spirit.
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my brothers and sisters, jesus says come to me all you who labor and are burdened and i will give you rest. take my yol k upon you and learn from me for i am motor vehicle and humble of heart and you will find rest for yourselves for my yoke is easy and my burden light. out of the depths i cry to you, oh, lord, lord, hear my voice. let your ears be attentive to my voice in supplication. lord, who could stand, but with you is found forgiveness that you may be revered. i trust in the lord. my soul trusts in his word. my soul waits for the lord more than sentinels wait for the dawn for with the lord is kindness and redemption and he will redeem israel from all their
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inequities. let us pray for the coming of the kingdom as jesus taught us. our father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thc kingdom come, t this. y will be done on earth as it is in heaven. give us this day our daddy bread and forgive us our trespasses and we forgive those who trespass against us and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. >> god of faithfulness, in your wisdom you have called your servant ant anyone out of this world. release him from the bonds of sin and welcome him into your presence so that he may enjoy eternal light and peace and be raised up in glory with all your saints. we ask this through christ our lord.
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>> amen. >> blessed are those who have died in the lord. let them rest from their labors for their good deeds go with them. eternal rest grant up to him, oh, lord. may he rest in peace. may his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed through the mercy of god rest in peace. may the peace of god which is beyond all understanding keep your hearts and minds in the knowledge and love of god and of his son, jesus christ. may all mighty god bless you. the father and the son and the holy spirit. >> amen. >> and so a very brief ceremony by the son of justice scalia, including the 130th psalm and the lord's prayer and prayers
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very familiar to many members of this court which -- of which six members, including justice scalia, are roman catholic. >> that's the supreme court's top administrative officer, jeffrey manier. then justice kagan, justice samuel alito, justice ruth bader ginsburg, justice kennedy, chief justice john roberts, the chief justice of the supreme court, then clarence thomas and this is the order in which they sit on the bench, justice stephen breyer and finally justice sonia sotomayor along with members of their family, court staff behind them and of course all those 98 former clerks of justice scalia who came here to be in this -- came here from all over the country to be part of this solemn ceremony today in the
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supreme court's great hall. >> understandably emotional, a sudden death, unexpected in texas and the close relationships as we say that he has formed, not just with his fellow justices but so many people who are in the court. talk about that a little bit for me. >> i was touched very much by the comments that justice ginsburg made. it's customary whenever a member of the court dies for each of the sitting around former just sis to issue brief statements and hers was by far the most touching. she described justice scalia and the relationship they had, she said we were bust buddiest budd she also said dis dissents always made the majority opinion better. that it forced her to go back and look again and sharper her own opinion to conform to what he thought were the weak points
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and she said she always benefited from that and it was a very personal, very heart felt statement. it's a tough day for all of them. of course, justice breyer made the first comment at an event earlier this week at new haven at yale university where he said it's a grayer day without justice scalia and that he will be missed. >> i was just going to say you don't have to be a conservative to appreciate the symbolism of those relationships. the idea in washington, d.c., this year in the middle of a very heated presidential battle and what is going to be a huge battle to replace justice scalia, the idea of listening to an opinion different than your own, of respecting it, of learning from it, of appreciating it. you mentioned his relationship as we've been talking with ruth
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bader ginsburg and just one example of their differences, she's someone who quite publicly officiated at a gay wedding very recently. >> in the court building. >> and he is someone who talked about moral feelings against homosexuality and tradition. >> yes, they had -- they had very -- very strong views about those issues and they could not have been more idealogically opposite but they got to know each other just a couple of blocks away from here down the capitol hill at the federal appeals court in washington, d.c. where they both served and that's really where they struck up what became a close relationships for not only them but members of their families, both of the spouses, they celebrated new year's eve together, they discovered they were oprah buffs, this he both participated in oprae opera.
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>> he liked to quote sometimes parts of that oprah. >> -- opra. >> she liked to quote that the main character crashes through a glass ceiling. >> so now the former clerks get their chance to file past the casket. and that's really what the rest of the day will be. this is a chance for people to -- in this silence solemn hall, this mar bld coal lumd hall here in the supreme court building to pass by the casket and pay their final respects. president obama will be here at some point today and just a short time from now the supreme court's doors will be opened to the public for people to come and pay their respects as well. they will be lining up here. the court had put the word out that this would start at 10:30.
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so i suspect that we will begin to see people line up. it looks to me that already already people lined up along east capital street on the far side from the court as we are that will eventually be able to make their way up here when the street is open again and come in to pay their respects as well. >> does this feel different to you than when the last time we saw this with chief justice rehnquist? >> well, in many ways, yes. the simple ways it feels different is it's a completely different time of the year, it's a very gray, cold day. and the other part of it is that justice rehnquist's death came after a long illness. so it was not a great surprise. justice scalia's death was a shock. so the whole -- the whole circumstances here, the last year of a president's term, all the politics, it really, chris, in many ways while the ceremony
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itself is unfolding in the normal traditional way and certainly tradition is the buy word here at this supreme court, everything about it is different. >> and we saw the brief catholic ceremony by his son, a priest. one of the questions that he often faced, whether it was in an interview or occasionally when he was out giving speeches and did q & a sometimes, frankly, with ruth bader ginsburg was about how being catholic had formed his faith, he blis ld at it but there have been books written about it and it's one of the questions that was constantly asked of him, how are you -- how do your judicial opinions conform with your catholic faith. one example he used to give as you well know, pete, in his own defense if we can put it that way is the death penalty because after an encyclical was written by pope john paul ii condemning the death penalty he was not if
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one of the court's most staunch defender of the death penalty and pointed to it. people who wanted to say he totally ruled by his faith said he's going by an original interpretation of the bible, just as he pushed an original interpretation of the constitution. >> well, he would say, of course, that the question for the supreme court would be, is the death penalty unconstitutional. what he would say is how can it be unconstitutional when the constitution provides for the death penalty? it's one of the issues that this court will be dealing with, i'm sure, in coming months, if not coming years. at the end of the last term, justice stephen breyer wrote a very notable dissent in a death penalty case in which he says it's time for the supreme court to revisit that. because of all the variable uncertainties about the punishment, all the questions about actual innocence, that it's time for the supreme court
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to revisit that. whether -- and that's, you know, one of the many reasons why whoever gets to name the new supreme court justice here will be making the biggest shift on the court clearly in a generation. because if it's a republican president who replaces him, then you're really trading a conservative for a conservative. and the lineup of the court doesn't change that much. the idealogical makeup, but if it's a more liberal justice, then it would change it. now, these are members of the supreme court police force who are acting as the honor guard, who will be taking charge of the room in essence and making sure that everything unfolds as it's supposed to. and they'll be posted here in their spots at the four corners of the casket, and they'll remain here during the day. the four sides, i guess i should say. also, and now saluting.
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also, in the great hall is a portrait. this is another part of the tradition. there is a portrait of justice scalia that will be the only image of him inside the great hall. this was a portrait that was painted in 2007 that shows him seated in his chambers with things that were important in his life. there's a painting of sir thomas moore. >> a replica of the hat of sir thomas moore he wore to barack obama's second inauguration. >> that's recognize. that was one of the hats they would wear outside, on a cold day. there's a framed certificate of the american catholic historical society on the wall, a picture of his wife, maureen. there's a copy of webster's dictionary. he was a stickler about words, and probably the court's most vivid writer. certainly in his opinions. >> was known to pore over every phrase of the opinions that he
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wrote. >> these are honorary pallbearers. the other 12 of them in all, who were again former supreme court clerks of justice scalia's. >> the crowd across the street has left since the outdoor ceremony has concluded. but many of them have either gone back into their office or gone to get in line. they will have a moment to go by and pay their respects. >> just to orient you, to there left of the picture is the entrance to the courtroom. over the door is some black velvet that's been draped over the door, and then once you go inside the supreme court room itself where the justices have their bench and hear their arguments and hand down their decisions, there are two more symbol symbolic objects of mourning. there's black drapery on the front of the bench where justice scalia sat, and then on his seat
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as well. this is a tradition in the supreme court that goes back at least 100 years. >> son of immigrants, an only child, who did very, very well. in high school and college and law school. >> there's the portrait. >> right. and then just to the left of that, if you kept going, would be the entrance to the supreme court room itself. >> his legacy, pete. >> well, his legacy is certainly he'll be remembered as the court's most outspoken conservative. he, i think in many ways, pushed the court to a more originalist approach. one of the things that he felt most strongly about is his opposition to using so-called legislative history to guide the interpretation of federal laws. he said you should just stick to the words themselves. he also was a champion of the constitutional right of fair trial. he helped kind of lead a
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revolution there to court rulings that said you can't be sentenced for facts that weren't fined by the jury. the judge can't do that independently, and you also have a right to confront your accusers in court. this is his portrait here, this nelson shanks portrait, in 2007. another thing that's in there is a copy of the federalist papers. a reflection of his interest in originalism, and also in a way, his role in starting something called the federalist society, which was an orgsition at law schools to try to encourage a similar point of view about the law among law students and younger people. >> well, today and tomorrow at the basilica here in washington, d.c., where the funeral will be held, will be days of mourning. it did not take but minutes for a political fight to develop, to talk about his successor. a 5-4 court on many decisions that frankly made liberals cringe, from bush v. gore, hobby
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lobby, and citizens united. voting rights act, gun control, the violence against women act. there will be a pitched battle that has already begun here to find his replacement. tough to overstate the significance of it when you have a divided court. >> yes, and we'll have to see how long the supreme court goes without all nine justices, chris. >> justice scalia's body lying in repose at the supreme court throughout the day. you will see thousands of people who knew him, tourists, people who admired him, will go by his casket there in the great hall of the supreme court of the united states. i'm chris jansing with pete williams. we'll continue this coverage throughout the day here on msnbc. and we'll be right back with more. ♪
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and good friday morning to you. i'm jose diaz-balart. live after our town hall with hillary clinton and bernie sanders. i'll have more on that in a moment. first the republican primary in south carolina is now 24 hours away in our new nbc/"wall street journal"/marist poll shows a race that is tightening ever so slightly. donald trump is out in front, but his five-point lead over ted cruz is just outside the margin of error. two other polls give trump a wider lead among the field of six republicans and this morning, trump continues to defend himself against, of all people, the pope. there's new scrutiny of his claim of always being against the war in iraq as well. on thursday, buzzfeed found a
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2002 radio interview where trump said he did support an invasion. here is how he's responding to that. >> you remember saying that? >> no, but i could have said that. nobody asked me, i wasn't a politician. it was probably the first time anybody asked me the question. by the time the war started -- >> this was 20002. >> by the time the war started, i was against the war. and there are articles, i mean, there are headlines in 2003, 2004, that i was totally against the war. and actually, a couple people in your world in terms of the pundits said, you know, there's definite proof in 2003, 2004, trump was against it. >> but back here in las vegas, the democrats are preparing for another nail biter of a caucus. every poll shows a virtual tie going into tomorrow's caucuses. last night, right here on msnbc, both candidates got to make their closing arguments. >> if we continue going the way we're going, jose, in terms of a corrupt campaign fnls system,
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you know what's going to happen? a handful of billionaires are going to control the political life of this country. >> what the republicans today are saying is you can't vote on anything. >> do you promise to deal with immigration reform within the first 100 day snz. >> absolutely. we're going to introduce legislation. we're going to introduce legislation. >> as president, i will do everything i can to pass immigration reform and a path toward citizenship for those who today are undocumented. >> even if it's not to your best liking? >> of course. >> senator sanders wasn't really a democrat until he decided to run for president. >> gloria steinem, everybody knows gloria is one of the leading feminists in america, made me an hahnry woman many, many years ago. >> our political team is here in las vegas, and in south carolina. let me begin with nbc's kristen welker and political reporter alex seitz-wald, both of whom are here with me in las vegas. good morning, or as we like to say in las vegas, good still up
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from last night. >> party just getting going here. >> good to see you. let's talk about last night. i think hillary clinton was very forceful. >> she was. >> she, i think, was a lot more specific on a lot of issues than shoo had been in the past. >> congratulations on a great town hall. one of the issues she was very specific was the issue of immigration. you pressed her on whether she would introduce legislation in the first 100 days. this is the first time we heard her say, yes, in fact, i will. a lot of tough questions from the audience as well. one audience member pressing her on whether she would release had transcripts of her gold man sacs interview. >> i'm happy to release anything i have when everybody else does the same. every other candidate in the race has given speeches to private groups, including senator sanders. i take a back seat to nobody in being very clear about what i will do to make sure wall street never crashes main street again.
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and that you can count on. >> and of course, trustworthiness has been a big issue for her. we'll have to see what the reaction is to that exchange. as you pointed out at the top, this is a nail biter of a race. the clinton team really trying to lower expectations. >> the fact it is a nail biter says a lot about how the campaign has changed because who would have guessed that nevada would have been a place where sanders could really give her a run for her money? >> absolutely. he was down more than 20 points just a few months ago. you know, you talk to his time, and they acknowledge this is really a critical state for him. he needs to prove he can win somewhere outside of very white states heading into march 1st and the much bigger map with a much more diverse electorate. they have identified nevada. last night, took some interesting criticism that he has had about president obama as well as bill clinton. take a look at what he had to say on that. >> i was asked to comment on a
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bill clinton's very, very strong criticisms of me. chuck put it in to context. wasn't that i went around attacking bill clinton. >> fully understand it. >> bill clinton has been on the campaign trail making some nasty comments about me. i was asked about that, so i happen to think bill clinton did a pretty good job as president. >> so this is, you know, kind of bernie sanders in a nutshell. taking on the establishment, but that also puts him at odds with two of the most popular figures in the democratic party, president obama and bill clinton on some issues. >> kristen, as we look towards south carolina, hillary clinton getting key endorsement. >> she is, and the point alex was talking about is going to play big in south carolina. she's getting a big endorsement from top congressman james clyburn today. this is something that could help her rally african-american supporters. she already leads senator sanders among african-americans, but remember, jose, this is such a critical voting block in south carolina. they made up more than 60% of democratic primary voters back
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in 2012. so this could really help to put her over the edge. if it's a close race in nevada or she loses, she needs to have a big win in south carolina if she wants to regain the momentum she lost in new hampshire. >> could she actually, alex, lose here? >> i think she definitely can. there's been so little polling that the best information we have is from the kind of body language of the campaigns. and the sanders campaign has been very bullish. they have been pouring in staffers here. clinton campaign downplaying expectations. getting on a plane possibly before we have the results of the caucus, heading straight to texas. i think that tells you a lot. >> it does indeed. thank you very much. good to see you all. and thanks for being with me in vegas. i want to go now to south carolina. katy tur is in myrtle beach where donald trump will hold a rally this morning. good morning. so much to talk about. the pope, iraq, threats of a lawsuit. we mentioned that interview on the stern show in 2002. let's listen to what trump said
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then. >> we really don't know the enemy. >> we know they're skulking around and you're a sitting dug. >> we have an idea of who the enemy is. >> are you for invading iraq? >> i guess so. you know, i wish it was -- i wish the first time it was done correctly. >> so, katy tur, was this a case of he was for the iraq war before he was against it? >> it seems to be the case. it seems like what we're seeing right now is donald trump who has been talking about how he's been against the iraq war on the campaign trail over and over again for months now, we're seeing the first evidence have of him in the time period in the lead-up to the iraq war. this is an interview on howard stern show where he says he guesses so, yes, he's in favor of the iraq invasion. yesterday, he tried to clarify that at cnn's town hall. he tried to clarify it again this morning on the "today" show, saying that was the first
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time anybody had asked him about that. he was saying at the time, he wasn't a politician. people didn't necessarily care what he was thinking about it. he says before the iraq invasion, before we actually sent troops in, he was against it. we still have yet to see any evidence of that, although donald trump does say there were a number of headlines. no one yet has been able to find evidence of him being against the war before 2004, which is a year after it started. jose. >> and katy, talk about after south carolina, the campaigns all move straight into super tuesday mode. what is that going to look like? >> well -- >> oh, we just lost katy tur. a nice shot of her there, but she was in an automobile live coming to us from south carolina. so i appreciate katy tur being with us. live television, that's a great part about it. you never know what's going to happen and not going to happen. i want to go to live pictures
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out of myrtle beach where ted cruz is holding a rally with one of the stars of "duck dynasty." hallie jackson is in columbia where the senator will be later today. great seeing you. the senator making his final pitch. not taking aim at trump, but to the man who is challenging him for second, marco rubio. >> absolutely. what we're seeing, jose, really is ted cruz punching up and punching down. trying to hit donald trump and trying to hit marco rubio at the same time. he has a packed schedule today. in myrtle beach, and i think he flies to charleston and comes to columbia. we're following him as he's doing these stops throughout the state. he's been upstate more. now we're seeing him along the coast. he's hoping to bring together these evangelicals to beat marco rubio. what's interesting is this ad that is out from his campaign really hitting rubio hard. you see it essentially splice rubio's positions on immigration back during the gang of eight immigration bill with president obama's talking points about the same topic. what this does is essentially
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paints rubio as an obama ally, essentially, which is obviously not going to play well with the republican base here in south carolina, particularly given that rubio's vulnerability is often immigration. the rubio campaign knows that, the cruz campaign knows that. that's why you're seeing the ad hitting him. a little surprising that maybe the ad didn't roll out sooner giving how impactful it could be in a place like south carolina. you have team rubio looking for a really good showing here in south carolina, too. they need to show they can kind of move forward and head into the march 1st states and even more importantly for them, the march 15th states and beyond as they're preparing for the long haul. so is ted cruz. he's almost at this point looking not just to tomorrow night but looking ahead to nevada and the march 1st sfats. his ground game, he has 27,000 volunteers in texas. he has 10,000, 7,000 in tennessee, oklahoma, georgia some of the places that will vote in a couple weeks. they're feeling like organizationally, they have the positions and people in place to
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play long-term. the question is now, though, can they take it to donald trump, can they close that gap? we have seen trump dominate in the polling. can they shrink the gap between them and trump, and could rubio, given his support from nikki haley, tim scott, trey gowdy, pull out a surprise second in south carolina? it's going to be a day, jose. we're going to be rubbing our hands tomorrow to see what happens. >> great seeing you this morning. i want to take you to washington, d.c. where the body of justice antonin scalia is lying in repose in the supreme court's great hall. the doors will open to the public about 15 minutes from now. thousands of mourners are expected to pay their respects. the court's longest serving justice, among them, president obama and the first lady. he will not, however, attend the funeral tomorrow. a decision drawing some controversy. our own chris jansing is live at the supreme court this morning. chris, good morning. >> good morning to you, jose. we are just a few minutes now after what was some solemn moments on the steps of the
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supreme court when the hearst carrying the body of antonin scalia pulled up there. lining those stairs, current and former members of the court, people who served him, and even some of them, it has been said, who were liberals. he loved nothing more than a good argument. arguably, the best known of the conservatives on the court. certainly the one who wrote many of the majority opinions. and one who really delighted in sparring inside that courtroom. now, his body in the great hall after a short ceremony that was attended by members of his family. he has nine children. he is survived by his wife and one of his sons is a priest, so a father paul scalia with a brief ceremony, including a psalm and the lord's prayer, and then as you say, throughout the day today, an opportunity for members of the public including many tourists who will file by
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and pay their respects to justice scalia. something that we have not seen in more than a decade, for a supreme court justice. in that case, chief justice william rehnquist, to lie in repose there in the great hall. the supreme court for those who don't know the geography of washington, d.c., is directly across the street from the capitol. that is where things heated up immediately following his sudden death. what will happen for a replacement? so many critical decisions over the last several years decided by a 5-4 vote, and as you well know, many republicans pushing back against the idea that president obama should be able to nominate a replacement for justice scalia. one of the people in the center of it, chuck grassley, the head of the senate judiciary committee. we have gotten some indications over the last couple days, jose, that the president may do what he has done in the past successfully. that's nominate someone who has
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been through a nominating process before, and is easily won confirmation by republicans. one of those people under consideration who is a judge in iowa, would put chuck grassley in an interesting position if he would have to oppose a justice from his own state. and so that is heating up, as you well know. it's been the topic of heated discussion on the campaign trail, but the next two days are about remembering and honoring justice scalia for his service to the country, however controversial, many liberals feel it was, he continues to lie in repose at the supreme court and tomorrow with a funeral mass. he was a life-long catholic at the basilica. jose. >> chris jansing in washington, d.c., thank you. ahead on this busy friday morning, much more on last night's democratic town hall in las vegas, bringing in immigration reform back in the spotlight. we'll talk a little bit about that last night, talk about it this morning as well.
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here in the state of nevada. undocumented immigrants make up more than 7% of the entire population. listen to this, more than 10% of the labor force is made up of undocumented immigrants. with immigration reform on the minds of so many people in the state every day, we asked bernie sanders and hillary clinton about that issue last night. >> i'm not a dictator here. it has to do with a little bit of cooperation from the congress, but it is a major priority when you have 11 million people living in the shadows. i think we owe it to them to move as expeditiously as we can.
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>> we're going to introduce legislation. absolutely. i'm going to call everybody on the committee, democrats and republican uz like. >> within 100 days? >> yeah, i'm going to introduce my priority legislation and this is at the top of that list. >> both candidates say reform is a priority, but could it actually happen? astrid silva is a dreamer and a hillary clinton supporter. you were there last night. >> it was great. >> what did you think your candidate and bernie sanders were able to define on issues of importance for our community? >> i think something really important for my community was the three to ten year bar, and hillary clinton hit on it, talked about it. you know, she was even called out by some of the audience members on it. and i think if anything, last night, i saw more and more how the democratic side is staying consistent to our families, whereas the republican side is still continuously attacking us. >> the three to five bar, for the folks who may not know, there is a bar, in other words,
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a prohibition of being let back in if you're deported, three to 5. there trz rr a ten-year bar, you need a special permission to come back in. i don't think the president is the one who can do that. >> the president is not, and that's exactly what secretary clinton defined. she will need a congress supporting her. i think that's important for us to all highlight, that a president can't do that. executive actions can help us, but as we have seen, doaca is temporary. >> i think that finally, she was able to say it would be a priority, because in the past, she hasn't wanted to be very specific. i insisted on that last night. i mean, 100 days. will it be a priority? chuck todd, a masterful job last night in the debate, but specificity on what, when, and how, i think, is important that we note. and i think both candidates were able to handle that issue pretty well. >> it's something i can respect. my family is waiting for this.
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my family right now is facing deportation. for us to know exactly when it's going to happen, we need to live in the reality that right now, deportations are taking place. both candidates highlighted how important our families are. at the same time, it's important for my family, they were sitting at home watching, my mom was in the audience, knowing they're treated at humans. >> it's so easy for people to discuss this issue as if it were numbers on a paper or statistics that you can crunch. i hate that word, but it's the crunching of statistics that is included, and yet, it is families. it is your mother and your father. and there are millions of people in mixed status families that are looking towards politicians and saying, when are you going to uncrunch the numbers and talk about us? >> we had a woman in the audience, her husband went to mexico. she was told he would be there for three days. it's been six years now. her daughter was in
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kindergarten. she's about to enter middle school. that's what we're seeing every single day. that's something we need to press on candidates. we need to be able to push them to say here's what our families need. at the same time, say we need further than what you're saying. >> that little girl has not been able to hug her father in so many years. now she's growing and still doesn't have her father because of the crunching of numbers and not talking about people. >> exactly. >> good to see you. >> thank you. >> say hello to your parents. don't miss andrea mitchell's exclusive interview with former secretary of state madeleine albright on why she's supporting hillary clinton. that's noon eastern right here on msnbc. we'll have much more from las vegas ahead. the other huge issue that got the democratic candidates hyped up last night, talk about that. first, a live look at spartanburg, south carolina, with jeb bush joined by his mother, former first lady barbara bush, sitting right beside him. hoping to drum up support before tomorrow's gop primary. we're back from nevada or as it should originally be said,
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nevada. it's a spanish word. just saying.
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let us help grow your company's tomorrow, today at business.ny.gov welcome back to las vegas. we're just one day away from the democratic caucus here in nevada. both hillary clinton and bernie sanders made their case to voters last night at the msnbc telemundo town hall. i moderatored alongside my friend chuck todd. >> i think that it's important for democratic voters to take a hard look at all of the candidates, and in this case, obviously, senator sanders and myself, and to evaluate who's got the best plans, who's got the most experience, who's ready to do all parts of the job. >> do i believe that there has to be a major focus on the economy when the middle class is disappearing, when people in nevada and all over this country are working longer hours for lower wages and almost all new income is going to the top 1%? yeah, i'm going to focus on
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that. >> and joining me now, nevada state assemblyman reuben, he has endorsed hillary clinton, a nevada congressman, lucy. let me start with you, your impression of how the candidates did, and the issues they confronted last night. >> first and foremost, you did a great job last night. >> thank you. >> also, both of the candidates. i have to give credit to both of the candidates. an excellent job. we're very excited they're here in nevada in a state as diverse as america. i'm proud of hillary clinton, she did an excellent job as she always does presenting the issues, why she's best to be president of united states of america. she's prepared from day one, has the experience and a plan. i was excited to see both of the candidates are addressing western issues, immigration, other issues impacting nevada and the west. >> lucy. >> i think just like we were commenting before wie started,
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it's just incredible that here we are two years later and this issue is taking first front foremost amongst these candidates. this is something that we have been fighting for for a very long time, and to have the leading presidential candidates make this a top priority in their campaigns is really a reflection of the work that so many people have done to push immigration reform forward. >> and lucy, senator sanders has spent a lot of time talking about economic issues on the campaign. and hillary clinton has seized on that saying you can't be a one-issue candidate. how do you respond to that as a sanders supporter? >> it's unfortunate because this naedz to be a comprehensive conversation, the same way we need a comprehensive solution. we talk about the effects on the economy. if we don't get immigration reform right and also get the economy right, what's the point of having immigration fixed but then these folks don't have access to jobs and their children don't have access to college education, affordable college education, they don't
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have access to high-quality education. these are issues that are not in silos. they don't exist in silos. of course we have to talk about this in very broadways because they're complex problems and they need to be addressed in that way. >> you have endorsed hillary clinton for president. how do you explain bernie sanders' rise, and i mean, if we were talking three, four months ago about nevada, no one would have said that hillary clinton is going to get a run for her money here against bernie sanders. >> well, look, i think what's important here is we have two very qualified candidates to be president of the united states of america. and i think what's clear here is that any of the democrats here are a lot better positioned to lead the country than any republican. and i think the message of both of the candidates, you know, they're talking about immigration, talking about improving the economy. i think that's the message that's resonating with america. that's why i feel that the democrat is going to go on to be president of the united states because we are best positioned to be able to tackle the issues that are confronting our country. many issues not only confronting
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our country but the rest of the world as well. >> i think it's important as you're talking about silos that the issue of immigration is not an issue of just latinos, and by the way, latinos just don't think about immigration. >> exactly right. >> the issue of jobs, the issue, for example, of the foreclosure crisis that hit nevada maybe more than any other state in the nation, unemployment continues to be a problem, our community continues to be more unemployed, less high school graduation rates, african-american and latinos. at the bottom tier of graduates here in nevada. i mean, these are issues that concern all of us regardless of what language we speak at home. >> and frankly, that's the reason why i think senator sanders' message is as impactful as it is, why it's resonating the way it is. when he talks about immigration reform and the aggressive way he does, and the most expensive platform out of the two candidates that has been presented, he's also talking about the other issues that
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frankly are more important to the latino and the immigrant community. >> thank you both for being with me this morning. thank you for receiving me the way you have in the lovely city of las vegas. up next, back to our nation's capitol where the public is invited to pay respects to the late justice antonin scalia. barack obama and the first lady will be among the visitors today. we'll take you there live next. or across the globe in under an hour. whole communities are living on mars and solar satellites provide earth with unlimited clean power. in less than a century, boeing took the world from seaplanes to space planes, across the universe and beyond. and if you thought that was amazing, you just wait. ♪
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let's go back now to the supreme court where viewing for the late justice antonin scalia is now open to the public. chris jansing is standing by with pete williams, ari melber, and luke russert. >> it has been an emotional morning at the supreme court. the casket of antonin scalia walked up these huge stairs leading up to the great hall where he's now, as you say, lying in repose after a brief ceremony that was led by his son paul, who is a priest.
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someone who, as the longest serving member of the court, made many friends inside that building. but as a jurist, also made many enemies. those he was confirmed by 98-0, he also was someone who wrote many of the opinions in a 5-4 court that caused liberals to cringe. but was a champion for many conservatives. pete williams, the "new york times" called him a leader of a conservative intellectual renaissance on the court. >> certainly getting the court to focus more on the actual words of the laws and not on what the founders intended. it was quite a scene here, you're right, chris, a day ofce than 100 of his former clerks lining up on these magnificent marble steps to watch the casket of their former boss go by. among them, two judges, former solicitor general of the united states, all nine supreme court justices were inside the great hall, along with retired justice david suter, and tomorrow, the
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funeral here in washington, where the funeral mass will be celebrated also by his son paul. >> you have been covering this court for 23 of his 30 years. you have seen the friendships that developed. it was moving to watch the other members of the court who lost him so suddenly. >> justice stephen breyer called it a day that's now a grayer day, without justice scalia. it will be a time of adjustment for the court and we'll have to see how many days we go without all nine justices. >> it could be a while. ari melber is alongside here on east capitol, i believe is where you are. it's a cold day here in washington, d.c. but a lot of people lined up to pay their respects. and as we said, he often divided americans on his decisions. but clearly, someone who brought many of the opinions of this court into the forefront with his vivid writings. >> that's right. it is cold out here, we're on east capitol street, as you mentioned, chris. and first street, the street
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that cuts between the supreme court and the capitol. despite the cold temperature well after this proinvestigation, as you described, and the body brought in to lay inside the supreme court, you can see behind me a long, long line of people who are here to gather their respects. indeed, i'm going to take you through here. i'm on first street. this is a line that goes all the way around the supreme court, and well, well back. we walked it. i can tell you it's diverse in many ways that you can see to the naked eye. we have seen young people who obviously were born while justice scalia was already on the court. and we have seen older folks who may have known him for a long time. we have seen people who are passionate about it. you mentioned. chris, that his opinions at times were seen as divisive. that's the case to so many issues in law and politics. yet, for those who believed in justice scalia's view of the constitution of applying original meaning and text to give our founding fathers' words force, hundreds of years after they were originally written,
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for those folks, there's a lot of desire to be here to wait in line and obviously to pay their respects. the other thing i can tell you is i also went inside the court building. i ran into bryan garner, someone the viewers may have seen on our air because he co-authored two books with justice scalia, a wide range of people, obviously. also dignitaries inside going throughout today to pay their e respect. as you have seen on the video closed circuit, the clerks continue to play a role. we see four of them surrounding the body as it lays and people come individually to pay their respects, chris. >> thank you so much, ari melber. and as he was an adherent of originalism, you wonder what his own interpretation would be of the constitution and this battle that is going on across the street in the halls of congress about whether or not president obama should nominate his successor or whether there should be a wait for whoever is elected the new president. luke russert is across the street, outside the capitol for
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us. and luke, it would be hard to overstate how quickly and how vociferously this battle started after the death of justice scalia. >> it was quite remarkable, chris. literally, the news broke and within an hour, the senate majority leader mitch mcconnell releasing a statement saying that the republican leadership in the senate, of course, the body that is in charm of confirming any supreme court justice nominee, was not even going to take up a nomination, much less have a vote. to give you an idea of where we are, obviously, if you haven't been to washington, the supreme court is right here. the judicial branch, if you come here, across the street is the legislative branch. supreme court used to be housed in the basement of the capitol. while today is a day of solemn remembrance, next week, when congress gets back, this will be the issue at the forefront because honestly, if you look at the schedule, congress does not have much to do this year. it's an election year.
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they're planning on having an early recess. this will take up all the oxygen. what's going to happen? the republican party is divided. you have some moderate republicans who say we should at least allow president obama to put forth a nominee. it doesn't mean we have to give them an up or down vote, but give them a hearing in the judicial committee of the senate to air out this nominee, see what they have to say. other republicans say no, no, no, no. we must block them right away. give the president the idea that he will have absolutely no influence here, that we're going to stop this. the next president will be the person that puts forward a supreme court justice. democrats say this is completely unfair. you have to let us have our voice. the constitution is the prerogative of the constitution that president obama can move forward on a pick. president obama has a very big decision that he's been working on this week, chris, of who they're going to put forward. is it going to be somebody that can get galvanized, some of the groups within the democratic caucus. could it be a minority?
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we heard rumors it could be loretta lynch to galvanize the african-american vote. could it be an asian-american? that's what we're going to see next week. while it's respectful and solemn today at the supreme court, and we remember justice scalia in a few short days, his remembrance will really we felt in who his successor will be on capitol hill because that fight is going to take up congress' time from now into the summer. >> woutsithout a doubt. luke russert, thank you very much. at least one former justice has weighed in saying president obama should indeed nominate a successor. pete, you wonder what those adherents of originalism would think about the debate. >> the former justice was sandra day o'connor who said in her style, they should just get on with it. >> that pretty much puts a punctuation point on her thoughts on that. we're going to be here throughout the day, as you see
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what we expect to be thousands of people who will come out in the cold in washington, d.c. to pay their respects to the 79-year-old who died suddenly in texas. new jersey native, the first italian-american on the court, someone whose writings were so vived that people who had nothing to do with the law enjoyed reading them. they will be debated for many years if not decades to come, particularly his seminole writings on the second mae amendment, something he felt so strongly about. this will go on until 8:00 tonight, and his funeral, which will be led by his son, father paul scalia tomorrow at the basilica shrine of the immaculate conception in washington, d.c. >> chris jansing, thank you so very much, along with pete williams, ari melber, and luke russert. we'll have special coverage of justice scalia's funeral mass tomorrow with brian williams starting at 10:00 a.m. eastern time. up next, a special look at the
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we are back live in las vegas where the democratic candidates are making the final push to win over nevada voters. last night at the msnbc telemundo democratic town hall, hillary clinton and bernie sanders pulled no punches which talking about their democratic credentials. >> there is one of the two democratic candidates here who actually ran against barack obama. it wasn't me. >> senator sanders has also attacked eed president obama. i don't know where it comes from. maybe it's that senator sanders wasn't really a democrat until he decided to run for president. >> joining me here in las vegas, "time" magazine writer, sam, and victoria and aaron. thank you for being with me.
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sam, how do you think these personal swipes will play with voters? >> it's hard to say at this point. sanders supporters seem to be somewhat more prickly than clinton supporters. if you hear clinton going after sanders, the first time she went after him was a sexist remark back in the first debate in october. you talk to sanders voters and they feel sort of personally offended with the candidate. i think the story is different when you're talking about clinton because sanders is punching up. clinton, because she's the front-runner, it looks like she's -- some voters interpret it as bullying when she talks down to sanders. that may change. >> chuck todd also asked mrs. clinton about her so-called trust deficit with voters. i want to play a bit of that exchange. >> you know, look. i am absolutely focused on delivering results for people. it is obviously troubling that people have questions about me, which i will do my best to answer. people are really asking, is she
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in it for herself or is she in it for me. i have always been somebody who believed and raised ipmy family and my faith that i with my blessings had an opportunity and obligation to do what i could to help others. that's what i will do as president. >> it seems she's fine tuning that message of why it is that there is that trust factor. >> and such a difficult issue for her. we especially saw that in new hampshire. what she did last night in the debate was effective. she acknowledged and said, you know what, let's talk about the issues where. she highlighted those issues. she did a good job of connecting with the latino population. not just on immigration, but she talked about minimum wage. she talked about labor issues and she also talked about social security. i think she did a bang-up job talking about women and social security. and we know that for latinas, that's an especially poignant concern. >> there was also the issue of age, of raising the age. there was also the issue of the foreclosure crisis. so many issues that affect not
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only the people in nevada but throughout the country. but that have especially hit hard hit our communities here in nevada. >> you know, we see that criticism, people saying we only talk about immigration when it comes to latino issues. yesterday there was a big focus on veterans issues, education when they talked about the woman who asked, will daca students be able to benefit from some of the same programs with free college. yesterday, the huge shift from clinton was talking about the 100 days. in the first 100 days, she would try to get legislation introduced on immigration. this is language she stayed away from before. >> you mentioned this on twitter as well as i know some of the reporting you're doing. why is that a change? what is that change? >> the change is that everybody knows on the left obama got hit for saying they would pass immigration, and that obviously didn't happen. so clinton is someone who wants to be measured in the way she does things. she doesn't want to say, yes, we're going to do this, because then the promises start adding up. i think to chuck todd's credit,
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this is the second time he brought it up. you can only get one priority done early on. she has previously dumured in the issue, you asked her to confirm it, will you make a commitment that you will do immigration. she for the first time said she would. >> sam, the race here is neck and neck. a poll this week has clinton one point ahead of sanders in nevada, 48 to 47. what more does she have to do here to kind of win this caucus? >> i think she needs to hold out. one thing about sanders and we have heard this across the country is he does particularly well with young voters. i saw that yesterday. i went canvassing with young dreamer who came up from phoenix, staying four days, they're canvassing for him, so committed and willing to do whatever they can to get him elected. kind of a different feel. for them, their top issue is not necessarily immigration reform. they talk about the whole range of issues, i went around a group of people, like a number of them
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were -- a few were undocumented. a couple had parents who were undocumented. i asked what their top issues were. it was climate change, it was political corruption. it was free college, all these issues that were not what you would expect them to be. >> and on this issue, all of those issues are important, and are priorities, until someone is deporting your father or mother. and then all of a sudden, political issues go to the side. because the fact is that we have to remember that it's all about people. and families are being divided, destroyed, and separated every single day. you know, an interesting aspect i thought of yesterday is when i asked senator sanders about what it is to be a democratic socialist. and especially when there are a lot of people who have left dictatorial regimes searching for freedom. when they hear the word socialism and political revolution, they think of the castro brothers, 57 years of
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dictatorship or chavez and venezuela. here's part of that interchange. >> when i talk about democratic socialism, i'm not looking at venezuela, i'm not looking at cuba. i'm looking at countries like denmark and sweden. you know what goes on in those countries? all of the kids who have the ability and desire go to college, and you know how much it costs? it is free. the retirement benefits for their elderly, much better than they are in the united states. we are talking about the concept, which i don't think is a radical idea, of having a government which works to represent the needs of the middle class and working families rather than just the top 1%. >> victoria, just your thought. was this a relevant question to ask him? >> jose, when you asked that question, i said, gracia. while mexican americans make up the majority of the latino population, a third are cubans,
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venazalens, and if you want to court their vote, you need to address the concerns. personally, i wasn't satisfied with senator sanders' answer on this. >> why? >> in venezuela, in cuba, you have dictators. you don't have somebody who is lawfully elected. he said, well, i want to be like european countries, but he didn't address the problems with these latin american countries and why venezuela might say, why do i want to support that vision? i love venezuela. so i thought you pressing him on that was fantastic, and hopefully, he'll come up with a better answer. >> sam, victoria, thank you very much for being with me. so nice to see you all. >> nevada has a very diverse population, and the city of las vegas is unique, to say the least. msnbc's jacob soboroff spoke to some of the potential voters working in las vegas to see if they want to take a chance on any of the candidates. >> welcome to las vegas.
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people from all around the world come to nevada looking to get rich quick. and our very own u.s. presidential candidates are no different. since nevada moved its caucus to earlier in the election calendar in 2008 right after the new hampshire primary, the silver state has become a can't-miss stop on the trail to fund-raise and to stump for votes. you see any presidential candidates come through vegas? >> no, we haven't, not yet. >> what about the pawnshop, any candidates stop in here? >> haven't seen any. >> have you seen any presidential candidates in vegas or in your limousine. >> no. >> none? >> none. >> why aren't you driving any presidential candidates? >> i wish. >> i think hillary and bernie are coming soon, right? i'm going to check that out, today or tomorrow. >> hillary clinton hit the nevada jackpot last year, raising $580,000 from nevadaens in 2015. that's four times what bernie sanders pulled in and beating out every candidate in either party. on the republican side, marco rubio who for a time grew up in
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vegas, collected the most dough in 2015. >> have you given any money to presidential candidates this time around? >> this time around, i have not. i probably will. probably hillary. >> if you were going to pawn something and donate that to the candidate, who would it be? >> donald trump. >> how much would you give him? >> whatever is legally all allowable. >> over $2,000? >> i would. >> you must do a good business in the pawnshop. >> that's the name of the business. >> winning the fund-raising battle in any state is not a guarantee of an electoral bid. even pollsters are unwilling to predict what will hamann. >> are you going to caucus? >> i believe i am. >> are you going to caucus in the election next week? >> yes. >> who are you going to caucus for? >> my friend, mr. trump. >> are you going to caucus for the election? >> well, actually, that's the democrats that caucus. >> republicans too. >> do they? okay, well i have to get a little dpaesh. >> on tuesday. >> tuesday. >> i'll give you the update.
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it's on tuesday. >> you know, jose, they say money may not buy your delegates or votes here in las vegas. donald trump, amazingly, has not raised any money practically here, but he's near the top of the polls. when you talk to people in the field as well, same thing with bernie sanders. incredible to see. >> jacob, you were with elvis and in a limo. i want to see your expense report. thanks, jacob. >> that wraps up this hour of msnbc live from las vegas. thank you for the privilege of your time. tamron hall is up next from columbia, south carolina. i'll see you soon. think of it as a seven seat theater... for an action packed thriller. ( si'm out of thec ) hi, office right nowmma. but will get back to you just as soon as i possibly can. join princess cruises for exclusive discovery at sea experiences.
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princess cruises. come back new.
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defiance is in our bones. citracal pearls. delicious berries and cream. soft, chewable, calcium plus vitamin d. only from citracal. only from citracal. technology entire countries w if they could ever catch you. good morning, everyone. i'm tamron hall, coming to you live from the liberty tap room in columbia, south carolina. i met a lot of these folks last night at the basketball game, and they have shown up for our live broadcast. we have big breaking news for
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them and you at home in the race for the democratic presidential nomination. any minute now, south carolina congressman, a man this crowd behind me knows very well, james clyburn, the highest ranking african-american congressman in congress, will appear before cameras to endorse hillary clinton. secretary clinton will not be there, but she's campaigning in nevada ahead of the democratic caucuses there saturday. congressman clyburn's endorsement comes with south carolina's democratic primary a week from tomorrow. and with our new nbc news/"wall street journal"/marist poll out just this morning, showing hillary clinton with a 28-point lead over senator sanders here in the palmetto state. and dramatic developments now in the republican race. this morning, our new nbc news/"wall street journal"/marist poll shows donald trump's lead in south carolina has been slashed to just five points ahead of tomorrow's gop primary here. ted cruz, a strong second. and marco rubio and jeb bush in
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a statistical tie for third. and that drop for donald trump, you see there, if this is accurate, would be an eight-point dip for him. the republican candidates are out in force again in the final day of campaigning before tomorrow's primary. and they will be crisscrossing. you see on the screen there, the state from north to south, east and west. making stops in 11 separate cities. also this morning, there are new comments from both the vatican and donald trump after what became a so-called war of words between the republican front-runner and the leader of the catholic church, pope francis. trump is now trying to diffuse the situation. >> i don't like fighting with the pope, actually. i don't think it's a fight. i think he said something much softer than it was originally reported by the media. i think he was very much misinterpreted and i think he was given false information. >> and during the flight back to rome from his visit to mexico, the pope responded to a question about trump's vow to build a wall along the mexican border.
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now, according to translation of the pope's remarks in italian, he spoke in italian, provided by the vatican, he said, quote, a person who only thinks about building walls wherever they may be and not building bridges is not a christian. i say only that this man is not christian if he has said things like that. we must see if he said things in that way and in this i give the benefit of the doubt. now, trump's immediate response was to reports the pope had said he is not christian. >> he actually said that maybe i'm not a good christian or something. it's unbelievable, which is really not a nice thing to say. for a religious leader to question a person's faith is disgraceful. they're using the pope as a pawn, and they should be ashamed of themselves. that's the mexican government. >> now we have this for you to factor in this morning. a vatican spokesperson has
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clarified the pontiff's remarks saying the pope said what we already know. if we followed his teaching and positions, we should not build walls but bridges. this wasn't in any way a personal attack or an indication on who to vote for. he said what he said on the basis of what he was told, hence, giving him the benefit of the doubt. let's go straight to congressman james clyburn, speaking now, endorsing hillary clinton. >> thank you all so much. i hope that you aren't using this as an excuse not to go to class. but i can tell you, i have had worse excuses for not going to class myself. thank you all for being here. presidential campaigns offer us an important opportunity to take stock of where we are as a nation and make choices about where we are going as a people. eight years ago, south carolina and the nation made history with a choice of barack obama.
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it was an emotional campaign for many of us. a few days ago, i admitted that my head and my heart were in different places relative to this year's presidential primary. today, however, my head and my heart are in the same place. a few people speculated that my head was with one candidate and my heart with the other. that was not the case at all. my heart has always been with hillary clinton. but my head had me in a neutral corner. but after extensive discussions with my wife emily, who is here with me today, our children and grandchildren, and other constituents and friends here in south carolina and across the
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country, i have decided to terminate my neutrality and get engaged. this is my 24th year in congress. i had the opportunity to work up close and personal with hillary clinton and bernie sanders. my experiences with both have been pleasant and enjoyable. but in spite of how it may sound sometimes, campaigns are and should be about the future. and i believe that the future of the democratic party and the united states of america will be best served with the experiences and know-how of hillary clinton as our 45th president. we are facing some critical challenges. family incomes are stagnant. and the wealth gap is widening.
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educational costs are soaring. and post-secondary education, which is more necessary today than ever before, seems out of reach for too many. far too many communities have languishes in persistent poverty for far too long. i believe that hillary clinton is the best choice to help us conquer these challenges. hillary clinton is the best choice to achieve equal pay for equal work, and arrest the growing income inequality that exists in this country. hillary has devoted her life to early childhood education and affordable health care for all. hillary clinton's proposals for accessible and affordable high education will relieve the crushing debt of college loans
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and preserve the value and viability of historically black colleges and universities. and hillary clinton is far and away the best choice to reform our criminal justice system and restore the voting rights act to its rightful place, as the most effective guardian of that most sacred right for every eligible american in our communities. as a lifelong student of history and a former history teacher, i have often said that history lessons can be real blessings, but only if we have learned them. i learned a long time ago that hillary clinton is a fighter and that's what we need in our next president. the change we seek for this great country will not come
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easy. we need a real fighter. and i believe hillary clinton is that fighter. although i speak only for myself and those who have urged me to take a stand, i urge all like-minded south carolinians to join the fight. let's vote on saturday, february 27th, to nominate hillary clinton to be the next president of these united states. thank you. >> just heard there the endorsement that we got word of yesterday, confirmed as you see now, in his own words, congressman james clyburn endorsing hillary clinton where she has a sizable lead here in his home state of south carolina. we're hoping that the congressman who is also in columbia, will head over here to talk with us about his endorsement and the reasons, but let me bring in james, executive director of the south carolina democratic party, also with us
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is nbc's craig melvin. he's in spartanburg, south carolina, this morning. jason, let me start with you. you heard congressman clyburn say that his head was in one place and his heart was in a different place. i'm hearing that repeatedly from democrats around the country. hillary clinton's lead is almost insurmountable for bernie sanders at this point. he could close it, but it's still a huge gap. to hear this man who has known the clintons for 24-plus years say my head and heart were in conflict, what's your reaction to that? >> so congressman clyburn is our third senator from south carolina. there's hardly any south carolinians who don't respect him, don't respect his judgment. and so my reaction is that it's an historic nomination -- not nomination, endorsement. what i would say, however, is i don't think it's going to deter a single bernie sanders supporter. i think people who are supporting senator sanders are all the way in. it absolutely re-enforces the
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secretary clinton supporters and maybe persuades some to come her way because of his gravitas and the work he has done all over the world. >> hearing someone 24 years, a long history with both hillary clinton and with bill clinton, to have this dilemma, to know her record, far more intimately than the average voter and not be certain until now, this 11th hour, if you will, leading up. we have one week before south carolina voters look at democratic candidates, but that he's in this dilemma as well. what is hillary clinton -- i don't want to use the word not doing, because that's such a negative way to look at it, but why do you believe that hillary clinton and bernie sanders, with her history, her name recognition, her resume, why is this struggle happening for her? >> i think that these two candidates are very similar. i think they're both fighting for the middle class. i think they're both fighting for equality, for pafair pay, fighting so that america can be
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as great as it can be and continue to be that way. so i don't think that it's unique for congressman clyburn to struggle with this decision like anyone else. and it's a testament to him that he's able to stand up and step out and announce his nom -- his endorsement, i keep saying his nomination, sorry. his endorsement to secretary clinton because it took a lot of courage. a lot of guts. >> you could look add the polls and say she's up a massive amount. is that really a courageous move for an african-american lawmaker who has known the clintons for 20 years to endorse her. >> he's not driven by polls. he's driven by his guts, by his personal relationships, by his history and the work he's done all across the state. so it's courageous for anyone to step up and step out and say they're behind someone. and that's no different here. no different than anyone else you're going to have on who is going to say they're for any particular candidate. >> let me go to craig melvin who
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is also from south carolina. he knows congressman clyburn very well. what do you make of the fact of the way he said he had to put his neutrality aside, and he noted that it was just recently that he admitted his heart and head were in deplaces and he's come along now. what do you make of the transition? >> the congressman downplayed how effective his wife can be, how persuasive emily clyburn can be. i have heard from a number of folks that she has been a hillary clinton fan for some time. and she got in his ear along with one of his three daughters, one of his daughters, of course, is an fcc commissioner. another daughter is a school teacher there in columbia. and he was under a fair amount of family pressure to throw his hat in the ring, so to speak. here's the thing about congressman clyburn. not only is today's endorsement a big deal for a host of reasons that have already been discussed. congressman clyburn doesn't endorse presidential candidates. even when barack obama caught
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fire, the little known senator from illinois back in 2008, and they were really coming after the congressman pretty hard to endorse, cleszman clyburn stayed out of the race, did not endorse barack obama in south carolina in 2008. so to see him now come out and endorse hillary clinton has a lot of folks wondering perhaps is the clinton campaign in more trouble than they're letting on. we know that the polls have narrowed a bit here in south carolina. and also keep in mind, tamron, not only did he not endorse back in 2008, it was that dust-up that got a lot of attention back then when bill clinton picked up the phone and called jim clyburn after the south carolina primary and said in so many words that he was very disappointed that the congressman had made the campaign about race. so to see the congressman now make nice, so to speak, and endorse hillary, it's a big deal. i agree with what we just heard there. it's not going to matter a hill
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of beans to bernie sanders supporters. >> all right, craig, thank you very much for the history and insight as well. we'll talk much more about that and how the game is playing out in nevada right now. coming up this morning, the vatican spoke out on donald trump's feud. i mentioned that to you, on pope francis, saying this was not a personal attack. how is this playing out on the campaign trail? and also, again, people are talking about these new nbc news numbers out. some are believing this is an outlier poll that shows donald trump's lead in the state has now dropped to just five points. is it an outlier or is it a sign of things to come? is trump in trouble? we'll take a look at the numbers. also ahead -- >> i'll talk live with rapper activist turned reporter bun b, who has been covering the 2016 presidential campaign for vice news. he's actually reported from a trump rally here in south carolina. we'll talk about the youth vote, the minority vote, and what this
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we are still live at liberty tap in the heart of columbia, south carolina. at the top of the hour, we were listening to remarks from congressman james clyburn endorsing hillary clinton. we were also disgussing donald trump's dust-up, if you can describe it as that, with the pope. joining me now is national news correspond david brody, and also republican strategist matt schlapp to served as a collector for george w. bush. david, let me start with you. we have looked at the pope's comments and the vatican has
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given more clarification. it appears the pope was not directly focused on donald trump. he was asked about donald trump, but the comments could be applied to several of the gop presidential candidates from marco rubio, who is a catholic, to ted cruz as well. in this support of a wall, as it's been described by these candidates. so this came about trump, but it really could be applied, do you agree or disagree, to any of the republican candidates supporting the same stance? >> i think you're right. i think some of the candidates would acknowledge that. it's interesting, though, kameron, that he, the pope, talks about immigration, but let's remember in republican world or at least in deep very conservative world, this is a left-wing pope. that's the way they see him. for donald trump or any of these republican candidates, picking a fight with the pope to a degree a little bit or having this conversation is not necessarily a bad thing politically, at least here in south carolina or in south carolina, where you get into the heartland, more
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catholics, that becomes a bit of a different story. for sure in a general election, it's something to heed some caution, for sure. >> david, i think you make a great point. you know i'm a texas girl, and my family lives in the heart of texas. it was interesting to see the reaction from some of the media pundits who are stationed, let's say, in the new york area, compared to what i envision was the reaction from the folks who are my neighbors in tex tech. it's interesting to bring that perspective. >> yeah, and i think donald trump, look, i know everybody is walking it back now, to a degree, but when this first happened, if you thing about it, picking a fight, so to speak, with donald trump over immigration ain't going to work. it ain't going to work in south carolina, for sure. that is in trump's wheelhouse in a republican primary. look, if you think about it, there's a smorgasbord of things to pick from if you want it go the non-christian route with donald trump. ted cruz has picked some out for sure, but immigration is definitely not one of them. >> and matt, let me bring you in
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because you can look at and dissect the pope's words and dissect what donald trump said and decide for yourself, but in reality, as it's been pointed out, this, again, put donald trump ahead of the candidates as far as the news cycle. you know, i was just at a marco rubio event. he was there with governor nikki haley, senator tim scott. i swetweeted out the picture an said is thisexpanded picture of the gop. you have two immigrants and a southern senator supported by the tea party, but the donald trump/pope discussion is the majority headline. >> an indian american, african-american, two cuban americans, a prominent woman. we had a very really dynamic presidential field. but donald trump has dominated the media conversation about this race, and the pope, you know, i'm a catholic. i love my pope. he's a great man. you know, i wish i had been his
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political adviser on this trip because i think what he was trying to say is that we have to be welcoming of the stranger, and you can't call yourself a christian unless you're going to reach out your hand to help somebody. then he got tangled up in the sawnication about a wall. and there is a pretty big wall around the vatican. now we're having a conversation on whether or not he was atagging donald trump, which is going to do nothing but help donald trump. it's a bizarre episode, and i think the vatican realizes it, which is why they're trying to step back. >> speaking of bizarre, i can get baited into the vatican wall that you and other republicans have been tweeting in. we both know that is a meme that should stay in meme land. it's not a valid comparison here. if you want to make some distinctions, but to tweet out a picture, it's actually lame. i'm going to call it what it is. let's move on to something. >> tamron, no, no. let me say real quickly. my point is this. i think the conversation about the wall is silly. what he's trying to say is we need to be welcoming to the
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stranger. i think that's the point he should make. >> i think that's where it should have been left rather than the meme of the wall around the vatican. >> it's a fact, there's a wall around the vatican. >> i'm out with people talking in south carolina. i think those are the kinds of shots that it's turning off. every other person i have spoken with say they're sick of the silliness, sick of all the negative ads. and they do want to have substantive conversations, including immigration reform. hillary clinton has said for the thir first time in the first 100 days she wants to introduce legislation. fight that. don't fight with memes. i want to play the comments from donald trump in 2002, howard stern show. buzzfeed has, quote/unquote, unearthed the comments. let me play what he said to howard stern. >> are you for innovating iraq? >> yeah, i guess so. you know, i wish it was -- i wish the first time it was done rect correctly. >> the question was asked in 2002, long before the war
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started. by the time the war started, i was against it, and immediately after the war started, and for many years i have been against it. i said it will totally destabilize the middle east and iran will take over the middle east. that's exactly what happened. >> listen, that wasn't a strong support of the war. nevertheless, david, these are his words. i'll get you both to respond. go ahead, david. >> look, what donald trump is going to say, and this has been his line, he's used it with me in countless interviews. he says, look, i was a businessman back then. i wasn't one of these politicians that was crafting policy that was in, you know, having all of this information presented to me. so he's going to just talk off the cuff. you know, it's interesting. this off the cuff -- these remarks that you have, and maybe he'll say one thing and a little bit different, you know, an hour later, even, or a few days later. i mean, this is who donald trump is. what i mean by that is that he's just going to kind of talk about things the way he sees them.
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and in a weird sort of way, it's just his appeal, tamron. i mean, because he channels this person that's out there that just kind of feels the same way that he's feeling. >> okay, matt, let me get you in. in any way, does this have an impact on trump claiming he was against the war after it started? >> yeah, i think it does. i think, you know, this is good research. they found an actual interview where it seems to be different from what he is saying he believed at the inof iraq. look, i worked for president bush. i think history is going to tell us whether this invasion was a good thing or a bad thing. there's a lot of things about it that look destabilizing and a lot of republicans who agree with trump when he says this, but they have to take the measure of his karth. part is they want to know he's going to shoot straight with them. that's one of donald trump's strongest attributes. he shoots straight with people. when they see episodes like this, i think it could be
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damaging. >> matt, thank you. that's one of your attributes i like, as well. when you shoot straight and stay away from meme land. >> i'm not mean. >> meme, i learned from the hip kids behind me. coming up, on a more serious note, justice antonin scalia's body is lying in repose. we have live pictures. thousands are expected to pay their respects today to this conservative giant on the court, including president obama. live from the high court next. in new york state, we believe tomorrow starts today. all across the state the economy is growing, with creative new business incentives, and the lowest taxes in decades, attracting the talent and companies of tomorrow. like in the hudson valley, with world class biotech.
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some point today. let me bring in chief white house correspondent chris jansing. she is standing by. we don't know the timing for the president as of yet, right? >> that's right, but he will be here, it is expected, some time this afternoon with first lady michelle obama. the president calling antonin scalia a brilliant legal mind even though he was writing the opinion on many of the conservatives' most consequential decisions from bush v. gore to hobby lobby to citizens united. he voted, by the way, against obamacare. having said that, he is recognizing for the way he led this court in many ways for a conservative intellectual thought. wrote many of the opinions very painstakingly and loved nothing more than a good sparring on a legal issue, including with a couple of liberal members of the court, ruth bader ginsburg, who they considered thelselves to be best friends, and also close and a hunting buddy of elena kagan. today, until 8:00 tonight, in
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addition to the president, as you said, people will be allowed to come and pay their respect as he lays in repose. the last time this happened was for justice rehnquist more than a decade ago. this honor given to the man who was the longest serving justice on the court, for almost 30 years. tomorrow, a funeral mass at the basilica here in washington. tamron. >> thank you very much, chris jansing. and i know you'll be stationed there through the weekend. we have more breaking news to report to you now. nbc news has confirmed that famous novelist harper lee has passed away at the age of 89. she passed away in her hometown of monroeville, alabama. her passing was confirmed by the town's mayor. lee, of course, won the pulitzer prize for my favorite book "to kill a mockingbird." she returned to the public eye last year after publishing go settle watchman. funeral services for lee have not been announced. we certainly know her work will live on and impact many more generations. we'll be right back.
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welcome back. we're still live in columbia, south carolina. as you can see behind me, but we're keeping our eye on the big events in nevada. people from all over the world are coming to nevada, looking to hit the jackpot, and as it turns out, the presidential candidates are certainly nodifferent. jacob soboroff takes a look at how fund-raising in that state has been paying off. >> since nevada moved its caucus to earlier in the election calendar in 2008 right after the new hampshire primary, the silver state has become a can't-miss stop on the campaign trail to fund-raise and stump for votes. hillary clinton hit the nevada jackpot last year, raising $580,000 from nevadans in 2015. that's four times what bernie sanders pulled in, and beating out every candidate in either party. on the republican side, marco rub
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rubio who for a time grew up in vegas, collecting $305,000. >> and that was school house rock brought to you in that awesome msnbc way. let me bring in jon ralston, the new msnbc analyst and covering the nevada caucuses there. there you have it. in our animated way, basically, we see there that the move of the money here, and i read an interview on politico from a hillary clinton volunteer who was surprised how bernie sanders was able to raise so much money in that state. talk ground game as far as money there. >> yeah, this is what's changed in this state, tamron. bernie sanders was invisible here until late last year when he started to raise money all over the country. including nevada, and gradually, you could feel the momentum building. and then i think even they were surprised. they meaning both sanders and clinton, were surprised by the near tie in iowa, and then him crushing her in new hampshire. that momentum has carried over
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in two ways. one in front raising, he's been able to raise a lot here, and two, on the ground, he's been able to make incursions into where she's been strongest, especially in the latino vote, which even the clinton campaign acknowledges now. >> and we heard from the first time in that town hall yesterday, jon, from both candidates who say that immigration reform will be a legislative priority for the first time, hillary clinton is saying in the first 100 days, but speaking of bernie sanders' momentum there. i was reelding information on how you pointed out this was a slow simmer that really went into a boil. he actually started giving speeches there on the ground about two years ago to union workers and they really liked his message of income inequality. >> yeah, i really do think that's what's going on, tamron. hillary clinton was here very early, reached out to the latino community. she has gotten the endorsement of some very prominent deemers. you may remember back in may, she had a roundtable here followed by endorsements.
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i think what you said is the key, tamron, in the sense that bernie sanders' message of income inequality, economic social justice, really has resonance in a place, remember, where the recession hurt us here in nevada worse than anybody else. we still have one of the higher unemployment rates in the country, the underemployed rate. as i said several times this week, here you have a bunch of workers right around where i'm standing in the las vegas strip, who work in places that are owned by what bernie sanders likes to talk about. billionaires. so they see them doing quite well, and maybe they're not doing quite as well. i think that message has had an impact, and that's what hillary clinton is really worried about here going into tomorrow. >> and jon, it's interesting. i'm going to talk with congressman, hopefully james clyburn coming up, he just endorsed hillary clinton. a huge boost here, with her lead is enormous at this point. very different picture in nevada. but you have some latino voters in nevada like what some african-americans who question
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whether bernie sanders is late to the party. i know that his campaign points out, you know, his fight for civil rights early on in his career. but you're hearing some there question if he is now in the party now and not always been a presence. >> you know, it's interesting because we have been talking a lot about the latino vote here in nevada. and hillary clinton has a lot of prominent latinos both here and nationally campaigning for her in nevada. right now, but you don't hear much about the african-american vote, which people may not know was equal to the hispanic vote in the democratic caucus in 2008. they were both about 15%. almost every african-american leader in nevada has endorsed hillary clinton. that could end up making a difference for her tomorrow. the other wild card is that almost every major union leader except for the culinary union has endorsed hillary clinton. can they get their ground forces out? so this is kind of what happened
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in iowa. she had all the major endorsements, the key players on her side, and she still almost lost. i think you'll see that scenario potentially repeated tomorrow. >> well, it's a tale of two states. it's very interesting to see what's playing out so close together. thank you very much, jon. coming up, an unexpected face on the campaign trail this cycle. rapper and activist bernard bun b has been reporting for vice news in south carolina and in new hampshire. we'll talk with him. he says he's found some disturbing things on the campaign trail, but also some things that encourage him as a voter, and perhaps will encourage other young volters. we'll still waiting and i see him now, congressman james clyburn is in the building. after a quick break, we'll talk about the breaking news. his endorsement of hillary clinton.
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identity theft. it's not too late to join. lifelock memberships start at $9.99 a month. join now and get lifelock risk-free for 60 days, using promo code "bank". protection begins immediately. call 1800 lifelock or visit lifelock.com my heart has always been with hillary clinton. but my head had me in a neutral
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corner. and i believe that the future of the democratic party and the united states of america will be best served with the experiences and know-how of hillary clinton as our 45th president. >> and here with us now, live in south carolina, congressman jim clyburn. congressman, thank you so much for joining us here. >> thanks for having me. >> these great folks of south carolina glued to your ever word at the top of the word yorb you said a few people speculated my head was with one candidate and my heart was with the other. that was not the case at all. >> my heart has always been with hillary. my head had me in a neutral corner because i had made the commitment that i would not do anything or say anything to jeopardize south carolina's standing. as a first in the south primary.
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and so i just thought to come out early in the contest, some of the candidates might see that as being unduly exerting myself in the process. and may not participate. so i decided to stay out and of course family members and friends were beating up on me quite a bit by getting engaged. and my youngest daughter especially, angela, who came to the press conference today, said i finally got you. >> the women in your life. >> the women in my life did it. >> they pushed you to announce what you were already feeling in your heart. you have remained neutral, even in 2002008, when we were lookint the candidate who went on to become the first african-american president. you stayed neutral. speaking of issues of concern for south carolina, bringing up some of the important issues but not picking a candidate. this time around, even with the pressure in your own home, there had to be something within you.
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there is speculation it's because hillary clinton is in trouble. she's a huge lead in south carolina. but there's a fight in nevada, and there could be other fights ahead. is that why? >> well, no. no. you know, i don't blame young people at all. i was young once, a long, long time ago. john lewis and i met in 1960 when we were both involved in sncc. we were founding members of n sncc. when i see black lives matter today, i tell people, i see sncc and i feel what they feel. i want them to be involved. i would love for them to be for hillary because i think she's the best choice. and i don't mind sharing with them that feeling. but if they are involved with bernie or anybody else, just be involved. just get out there. whatever your passion is, go for it. and so i'm not blaming them for
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anything. i just believe that if you think about the future and who can best get us to where we want to be, i think hillary clinton is the better of the two. >> well, hillary clinton has said that bernie sanders is making promises essentially that he can't deliver on. promises that have been appealing to young voters and some african-american voters and we're seeing that trend in nevada as well with latino voters. do you believe bernie sanders is making promises that he cannot deliver on? >> well, let me put it this way. i do not believe there are any free lunches. and certainly there's not going to be any free education. i have made the white house aware of my dissenchantment wit the proposal they came out with because i do believe we ought to make education affordable. but i think for you to believe that they're going to make education free, i don't think that's going to happen.
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not in my lifetime, and not in my children's lifetime. >> bernie sanders believes he has a plan, he would say not to make education free, but tuition free. when you see judge people who say, i'm in debt before i even pick up a diploma, and at least there's an idea, they believe, coming frombu bernie sanders, h believes he can implement, are you saying listen, that's not happening? >> let me remind you, and bernie worked on this with me, when we passed the affordable care act, we passed along with it a big education act as well. and in that education, we took $40 billion away from the middle man and pumped it into student aid. and we reduced the interest on loans down to 3%. the fact of the matter is we made education affordable.
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now, that's expired. the recovery act is no longer in place. therefore, that went away. that is the kind of thing we ought to bring back. we ought to reduce the interest on student loans. but i don't believe for one moment that we're going to jeopardize the existence of the historical black colleges and universities. there are 103 of them in this country, and they're not, a few of them are public institutions, but most of them are not. they are church schools and they are other private schools. why would their students, they would be able to keep their students if they could go across town for free? so we have to look at where the sweet spot is. i would say that anybody, be careful what you pray for. >> let me ask you about the town hall last night. hosted on msnbc, where hillary clinton made the point that bernie sanders has attacked president obama, president clinton, and some of their legislative successes. she has made the argument that
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bernie sanders has attacked the health care law, and yesterday, senator sanders said, listen, i'm asked these questions. i'm not attacking. and he said that, quote, welfare reform, for what's your reaction? do you believe that here's a man who was not a democrat until he decided to run for president, as was noted. said his record is consistent with the message of democrats. is this an issue of bernie sanders not being able to continue some of the successes of president obama? >> no. i had that discussion with bernie. he and i have talked. he was here at the bay. and i have nothing but respect for bernie sanders. he has always caucused with the democrats. and he held office championship. he got it from the dmemocratic
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caucus. the democratic caucus in the senate can find commonality. >> is it unfair to highlight he was not a democrat until he decided to run for president? >> all is fair in love and war. >> i want to read some comments from african-american lawmakers who now support bernie sanders. ohio state nina turner, of barack obama, they control my destiny. they are very condescending to me. the former head of the naacp. you see bernie sanders has been consistent in fighting racism. he's been consistent in fighting stupid wars and greed. when you take those with hillary, it gets confusing. >> i've never been jealous very
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well. i wrote a pretty hefty check in support for her campaign. we see the presidential thing a little differently. >> congressman clyburn. thank you so much. i appreciate you being the columbia traffic. thank you. up next, congressman up live with freeman for the campaign and the rally in south carolina. why he said the election is not about issues. he said it's a popularity contest.
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there's no shortage of political pundits.
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among them though, providing news as a political correspondent and also a philanthropist and teaches the most popular class at rice university in the state of texas. my friend now joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> absolutely. we ran into each other in new hampshire. you've been reporting for vice news. tell me at least, how do you capture what you've experienced in these first few contests on the campaign trail? >> well, obviously, i don't come from a journalistic background and i don't purport myself to be a journalist. they do hard work on the road and i was brought in to have an outsider's view with a voice and because i don't come from that
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world, i have a different and unique insight into what's happening around me. >> so you were able to look at and i think what people would describe as the media insider and sometimes what can be a disconnect with what everyday people at home are talking about. what's the thing that struck you most at these big rallies? >> there's been a lot of coated language at these rallies. i don't want to make it seem like officers are racist, but there's coated language to kind of tiptoe around words they know aren't politically correct but most of them i think, people aren't really paying attention to what most people care about. a lot of this has been about selfies and autographs. it's basically when you get around the trump saying populas what matters. and you've not gone to trump but
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marco rubio, jeb bush, as well. but you believe this is about popularity and not policy? >> not all of it. i think for the most part, a lot of these people genuinely care about their families and genu e genuinely want a better life. it's about deciding who can give them that better life. who has the better chance in the office of helping them get to where they want to be in life? but when i look at some of these campaigns, particularly donald trump, i don't see people following him because of his stance or views on politics or foreign policy, what have you. in fact, most people at the trump rallies don't really like donald trump, but they just believe he has the best chance of beating the the democratic candidate and that's why they'll vote for him even though they don't align themselves personally with him as a person or his views. >> which is interesting, you point out we see with some evangelical voters who are willing to support donald trump
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even though they have concern about whether or not he's in alignment with their values but see him as a person who can win. you wrote about being in south carolina at a trump rally. the more i talk to people, these supporters are more anti-obama and anti-liberal than they are pro trump. that's what he wrote in your piece. >> absolutely. i actually talked to people that admitted that if donald trump wins the nomination, they're going to vote for him not because they believe in him, but because they believe he can beat the other side. for many people, and for many conservatives, rather, i should say, it's not necessarily about the candidate that best carries conservative views because donald trump has been in the lead pretty much for the whole run and the least conservative of most candidates. and that's the word i get from conservatives. but they do believe in an election, donald trump could possibly beat a bernie sanders,
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so they're willing even though they don't agree with him morally or politically, throw their support behind him to simply throw it back in the face of the democratic party. >> i want to switch it back to the democratic party here. there is a divide. we just talked to congressman ja clyburn who supports hillary clinton and you have this generational divide. what do you see on the campaign trail that struck you? >> i think it's the outreach. i think the young vote will be very crucial for the democrats. bernie sanders, not just as a politician, but a person, has a better record with young people. he's been very supportive of the youth and their movements. i think he's definitely got better ground on that. but we're in the south right now. you've definitely got to have a record of civil rights involvement and got to have a record of, you know, having a line of communication open with
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groups like the southern baptist conference and others. i think that's where bernie is weaker than hillary. >> people should check out your column with vice. of course, fellow texan and i don't think this is on a news program. shrill. and then that's all for this edition of "msnbc live." hang out with my south carolinian friends. coming up, "andrea mitchell reports." madeleine albright. right now on a special edition of las vegas, nevada, strikings out on bernie sanders for not being a real democrat.
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>> maybe it's that senator sanders wasn't really a democrat. he doesn't really know. the last two democratic presidents did. and you know what? well, it's true. it's true. you know it's true. >> southern comfort. clinton picks up a big endorsement today for south carolina. >> my heart has been with hillary clinton from day one. >> woman power. bernie sanders jokes about his feminist side. >> and in fact, gloria steinam, one of the leading feminists, made me an honorary woman. >> coming up here, hillary clinton supporter and former secretary of state madeleine albright to talk about the controversial appeal to women in new hampshire and bare knuckle brawl. ahead of tomorrow's republican
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primary in south carolina, the republican candidates are playing rough. and honoring justice scalia, the justice returned to the court he loved for the last time, passed an honor guard for a brief ceremony, led by his son, father paul, a priest. >> god of faithfulness, in your wisdom, you have called your servant, antonin, out of this world. release him from the band-aids of sin and welcome him into your presence so that he may enjoy eternal life and peace and be raised up in glory with all your saints. >> good day, everyone. i'm andrea mitchell in las vegas. it is a somber day in washington at the supreme court as justice scalia lies in great repose. his funeral set for for. we'll have pete williams coming up in a few moments with automatic details. but first, politics ahead of the
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primary and the democratic caucuses here in nevada. the democrats taking aim at each other during thursday night's msnbc telemundo democratic town hall, both trying to appeal to latinos. >> south carolina is congressman jim clyburn is endorsing hillary clinton. >> if people speculated that my head was with one candidate and my heart with the other, that was not the case at all. my heart has always been with hillary clinton. >> reporter: my colleague, kristen welker, joining me to
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discuss the democratic race. it's all about turnout. when we talk about nevada, you've got the whole state, which bernie sanders is traveling across trying to do what barack obama did to hillary clinton where she got the popular vote and he got most of the delegates to go where the population is so critical. >> reporter: that's absolutely right going to three different areas in the final day of campaigning before the folks in nevada start to caucus. you're absolutely right about the strategy, he's trying to run up the delegate count. what we know about this race in nevada, it's going to be incredibly close. secretary clinton started campaigning here about six months before senator sanders did. she had a very forceful ground game here, and he has caught up. he has the momentum now. she had a 20 point lead. he's narrowed that according to the latest poll. she's up by just one point.
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so tomorrow, andrea, it's all going to depend on turnout. as you point out, senator sanders has been aggressively courting to latino voters and both vowed to make immigration reform a top priority. secretary clinton saying she would tackle it within the first 100 days if she were in fact to be elected as president. tomorrow is going to be about turnout, particularly the millennials, if they turn out in force. that could be a big win for senator sanneders. he could be competitive in the larger more diverse states. it would be embarrassing but a win would be critical for her to regain the momentum she had. >> thank you so much to kristen welker and the political ground may be shifting. our new nbc news "wall street
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journal" poll shows donald trump for the first time dropping to a 5 point lead ahead of ted cruz among likely voters. joining me from south carolina, katy tur and then hallie jackson with the cruz campaign. let's talk about donald trump and the whole blow-up with pope francis and whether or not he's even talking about that today or just moving on. katy? >> reporter: so far, this is the first stop tea and we'll see what he starts talking about. he just took the stage but on the defensive one day before the state votes and it's about the poll. nbc news poll is one of the only with a diminished lead but a poll that was endearly after the debate, he's not calling it a poll he likes right now and on the defensive when it comes to george w. bush still in defensive mode on the debate over the weekend calling him a liar saying he should be
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impeached. here's what he toll savannah again on "the today show." >> voters are seizing on whether or not you accuse the bush administration of lying. are you still accusing him? the voter asked you about it last night. >> i don't think the voters are. i don't know if he lied or not. he could have lied. maybe he did, i guess you'd have to ask him. >> reporter: this fight with george w. bush could be one of the reasons we see him dropping. i spoke to a number of people within the campaign and they push back on donald trump telling him not to go after george w. bush so hard and even phone bank volunteers say there was pushback and trying to get them to vote for donald trump. we'll see how he tackles that today and whether he touches on the myriad of other things in the campaign today. andrea? >> thanks to katy tur and hallie jackson, what about ted cruz? this is a tightening race
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according to our nbc news "wall street journal" poll. he has to be feeling pretty strong today. >> reporter: that's why he's out at these multiple campaign stops throughout south carolina, andrea, and you see him not just hit donald trump but marco rubio as well. we saw the kerfuffle. the rubio campaign saying these are more dirty tricks from the cruz campaign. cruz's campaign said even complaining about this is making marco rubio's campaign look weak. they continue to engage in the tit for tat against each other and cruz this morning at his campaign stop hit donald trump essentially saying and i'm paraphrasing here, you can write on a ball cap but you've got to have a plan to explain how and where this country has come from. cruz trying to take it to donald trump and at the same time make sure he can finish in south carolina ahead of marco rubio, the fight for second place is
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really won that we're watching given how donald trump is dominated in the polls, at least recently, there's a question mark of whether anybody can overtake him but the second position could be key here. >> thanks to katy tur and hallie jackson. thanks to both of you. now to one of the talked about moments in the hillary clinton campaign. when hillary clinton and madeleine albright had this to say in new hampshire. >> young women have to support hillary clinton. just remember, there's a special place in hell for women who don't help each other. >> former secretary of state, madeleine albright joining me here. her first interview since that all happened. we want to talk about a lot of things, obviously, but i want to clear up from your perspective, what happened when you were in new hampshire campaigning for hillary clinton? >> i was very happy to be asked to introduce her, and i said a lot of different things. i have used that particular term
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now, i think you know, as well as anybody, many years and people were applauding. you know, we were all laughing. i was kind of surprised, if i have to tell you about the reaction to it because i said it so often but i should not have said it in the context of voting. >> there was a larger question here. why it became so controversial, which is the generational divide. and a lot of people of my generation, of hillary clinton's generation, and perhaps of yours have been surprised at the way young women have reacted. and the way the voting has turned out between young and older women because hillary clinton has not been getting support from younger women. what do you think is going on here? >> i think young women are extremely smart. i'm a professor. i teach and then at my college, wesley, happens to be the same as hillary's, there's a whole institute to trade young women for global leadership. i have a lot of respect for
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young women but i think we need to have this cross generational discussion and part of it, andrea, we can't go backwards, and i think we noerksknow and i it hasn't been easy. i'm sure they're sick of hearing stories how difficult life was for us, but i do think it's a question of not going backyawar. >> you have daughters. it occurs to me as i've been trying to think this through. all of us rebelled against our mothers at certain times and probable probably of my generation maybe breaking through barriers and feeling though younger women should perhaps be more sensitive to that, but they have their own issues. i talked to college women and younger women in new hampshire and elsewhere, they have different concerns. they're concerned about sexual assaults on campus.
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they're concerned about their own kreers acareers, and huge c loan debt in new hampshire. i guess they thought you were scolding them. >> i certainly shouldn't have been doing that, and i'm sorry about that, but what is so interesting is i meet with younger women all the time and mostly, they want to know about our experiences and they also always ask me life balance issues and how do they deal? in national security, it's a man's world. so i think that i have to say that, as i said, it was not my best diplomatic moment, but we need to talk about the concerns that they have, and it's my feeling that hillary is best positioned to help with those concerns in terms of equal pay for equal work and trying to deal with the issue of college loans and generally about how to have career and a family at the same time. >> i want to ask you about foreign policy. it's been a caren area to break
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through, but you and condoleezza rice and hillary clinton as secretary of state but you just came back from the middle east where women are in particular, stressed given the role that they have had to suffer, really, in middle east politics and now you see in the syrian war that women are on the front lines suffering. what's the insights you bring back from the trip? >> it's a global issue. women need to help each other across borders and really, hillary is the one at the beijing women's conference. i did come back from a very complicated trip in the middle east and met with a lot of women. and i think that they know they are having problems within their own societies. they want help, but they also want understanding about the kinds of things they're going
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through which may not be the m same as ours. it's understanding the issues and the global aspect of this. >> speaking of the civil war, every face of the presidential election here and wait for a better more informed foreign policy on both sides of the aisle, what do you think we need to know about what's happening in syria, the likelihood of peace talks even working now that vladimir putin and the russians seem to have new leverage in propping up assad and now it's unlikely that assad will go anytime soon. >> i think we know and literally from the trip, the number of forces that are out there both from inside the societies and also regionally and globally and that there really is kind of a proxy wars going on both regionally and globally and we need to understand the full scope of the problems and whether the talks that secretary
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kerry has had will really be borne out. we need to pay close attention and that's a reason we need a president with a full understanding of national security issues. i have never seen anything as complicated as what's going on now, and i think that you do need to be aware of the things. you've covered a lot of this and to know how complex it is, and that america has to be present. i fully believe that america has to be present, not alone, to help try to solve these issues. >> did you ever think ul see a political campaign where the leading republican candidate gets into a dispute and is criticized by the pope, by the holy father? >> i find that unbelievable. i think it's hard to disagree with the pope, but i think it is among the many kind of peculiar discussions that have gone on during this campaign. >> as someone who has just come
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back from saudi arabia and in the middle east, what is the reaction to the whole question of the republican debate over a ban on muslims or whether muslims can be trusted? >> there were so many is a pasa to this but i met with some society people and parliamentarians and i think they find it a tragedy there's islamophobia, as they call it, and a sense of not trusting people only because they're a muslim religion and not understanding how many muslims have been killed as a result of isis and the problems they're having. so i think they feel let down in so many ways of having people understand that muslims by majority, want to live a peaceful life. >> what do you think? is isis the next threat to
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security? how would you characterize the state of the world going into this critical election? >> to put it into terms that make sense, every county has been heard for. there are problems all over the world. while i was in the middle east, there were stories what the chinese were doing by putting various missile batteries on these rocks, so clearly that's an issue. but i do think that isis, desh, as i call it, a very big problem to the region there and to us and that fighting terrorism is something we'll have to do in the context of what the people in the region also want, which is to have stability and a good life. >> madeleine albright, madam secretary. good to see you. thank you for meeting us here. coming up, playing the win. i'm joined by the top strategist for the bernie sanders campaign here. you're watching a special edition of "andrea mitchell reports" live from las vegas.
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theand the kids always eat sky their vegetables.e. because the salad there is always served
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with the original hidden valley ranch.
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i was asked to comment on bill clinton's very strong criticisms of me. chuck put it into context. >> i understand. >> it was bill clinton has been on the campaign trail making some very nasty comments about me. and i was asked about that. so i happen to think bill clinton did a pretty good job as president, but let's be clear, i happen to think that our trade agreements from nafta through tpp have been a disaster. >> bernie sanders refusing to back down from his criticism of bill clinton and trade policies he called disastrous. tad devine is a senior advisor
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to the sanneders campaign. i feel like he was a little impatient and i don't know, you've got a sense of dismay with bill clinton and the criticism that's been coming at him. he seemed to be, you describe it. >> feisty. yeah. i think it's not so much just with president clinton, but i think bernie feels like every time i turn out, they make him attack on hillary clinton. >> he thought the clinton campaign was in disarray. they had felt entitled. they were going to get the nomination. that now it's that they are in trouble. is that your view, his view? >> i think there were a lot of
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attacks that came in in the campaign. i don't think they moved the needle for them. we try to talk about issues. bernie's got a message. it's a powerful message. sending too much to the top. that's what we'll talk about. >> one of the things he did acknowledge for the first time in our forum last night was that you might have to wait for a knee operation, that there might be delays or, you know, what is implicit rationing in the canadian or the u.k. model or singer payer universal medicare for all. >> i think bernie's great strength about everything, not just the issue of health care but everything is he's honest about it. i think that's connecting to voters. i don't see that as a liability. there is rationing in health care. 29 million people don't have health insurance and millions more can't get it because of the high cost of deductibles an co-pays. i think that honesty is is
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what what's connecting more than everybody else. >> you have others who worked in the white house and in other roles. >> worked on wall street. >> and worked on wall street, yeah. but it's hard to find an economist who hasn't done both. but these aren't the liberal democratic economists who are questioning the mathematics saying that there's really trillions of dollars in play here to create the kind of health care system and free college tuition for all. >> it's a great debate and we should have it and let the economists debate each other. i know bob wright spoke up yesterday about this. the health care system he's proposing will cost america less, not more. we can see that based on the cost of health care everywhere else in the world and provides health care to all of its citizens at far less costs. but that's a good debate. to say this economist said this or that, we have 170 economists
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to break up wall street and break up the big banks and have a lot of support on our side of the argument. >> looking ahead, south carolina. big endorsement from jim clyburn, the democratic leader on the house side and mr. south carolina. the highest ranking african-american in congress. >> he's an important leader of the state. he and bernie serve together and work together on an important piece of legislation on the affordable care act that helped to millions in centers. that's a big plus for hillary clinton. she's got electricied official support. we bring new people into the process and we think bernie can bring more new people in the process and that's how we win. >> how important is winning nevada for you? >> incredible. we were more than 30 points behind and we've closed the gap since. we try hard to win and it's a
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close race. it feels like iowa, i think it's close tomorrow. >> so he's around the state trying to do the caucus math game. it's a representation, he's got to hit a lot of rural areas and try to offset what you may be picking up here in las vegas and in reno. urban areas. >> it's a process like iowa, similar. but we try to win across the state. but listen, andrea, this is goe going on for a long time. we've got a lot of support and resources for him. it doesn't rely on big money but small contributions and i think we'll compete to california and hopefully win more delegates. >> how do you go against the super delegate? you pick up delegates but she's got 15 out of new hampshire. she had six super delegates, similarly in iowa. that's the only way she came out
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even. >> they should support the strongest candidate and the whole purpose of this nominating process is to prove bernie sanders can and will be the strongest candidate. the only one to bring in people in large numbers and tremendous support from independents and new people into the process. i think if we make the case for the superde delegates. >> are you down playing your chances in south carolina now? >> i'm not downplaying it. i think we recognize she's got tremendous support there and the electorate are favorable to the cause. going to campaign there but three days later, there's enterovirevents in the state. after michigan, big states, illinois, north carolina, missouri, so we've got to look forward to it.
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>> tad devine, thank you very much. good to see you here and the body of the supreme court justice, live in washington. we'll go to nbc's pete williams at the united states supreme court coming up next. ng, with creative new business incentives, the lowest taxes in decades, and university partnerships, attracting the talent and companies of tomorrow. like in utica, where a new kind of workforce is being trained. and in albany, the nanotechnology capital of the world. let us help grow your company's tomorrow, today at business.ny.gov ifor all the wrong reasons.gical you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin®. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. try zyrtec®. muddle no more®.
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don't drive or use machinery until you know how lyrica affects you. those who have had a drug or alcohol problem may be more likely to misuse lyrica. now i have less diabetic nerve pain. and my biggest reason to walk calls me grandpa. ask your doctor about lyrica. president obama and the first lady are expected to pay their respects at the court later today. pete williams joining me now from the supreme court. you know, watching that ceremony to see the casket up the steps past the honor, former clerks. and you describing the relationship that these justices have with their former clerks. it is an extended family, a
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family for life. >> reporter: that's right, andrea. and it's an unusually close association that justices have with their clerks. every justice is entitled to have law clerks, three or four of them each term and they last for about a year here at the court. that's how long they stay but they don't simply walk out of the justice's life. they continue to have reunions. they keep in close touch. this is a very moving thing for them. and just a moment ago, you saw the live picture inside the supreme court's great hall. and four at a time and the two facing the kas bet. they'll be standing there in honor for 30 minutes at a time, all throughout the day until 8:00 tonight when the doors finally close.
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this goes clear down to the corner with east capital and then wraps partway around the supreme court building, as traditions go and this is a place that is run by tradition, this is a relatively recent one. justice scalia is the second to line in repose here in the court. the second is earl warren. president obama will come by today sometime to pay his respects, and he will be escorted by a justice, something that antonin scalia is familiar with because the last time this happened in 2005 after the death of chief justice william renquist, it was justice scalia who escorted the first lady. >> rachel maddow's interview, vice president biden talked about whether the president should nominate or a choice of the next president. let me play a little bit of
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that. >> if we don't nominate someone in the next month or so, start the hearing pros, they say nothing's going to happen until the next election, it won't be until next june or july before you have a supreme court justice. we have a dysfunctional congress now. we don't need an institutionally dysfunctional supreme court. >> pete, you're right in the middle of this. president has the lists. he's now talking about nominating someone rather quickly and then the fight will ensue, but we have the vice president attending the funeral tomorrow and criticism by ted cruz in particular, but the fact that the president is not attending. would it have been expected by the court for the president to attend this funeral tomorrow? >> reporter: the vice president will be at the funeral tomorrow, we understand, and the president is intending the supreme court justices, in terms of how quickly president obama will announce the nomination, harry
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reid said to "hardball" not to expect anything for at least three weeks. >> interesting indeed. thanks so much, pete williams and all your coverage there from the court. and we have breaking news today. the author of "to kill a mock g mockingbird" died. this was forever impacting gregory peck's performance. waited more than five decades to release the prequel to her book. published last year, almost to a lot of controversy though over the authorship and whether harper lee wanted it to be published. harper lee was 89 years old. up next, the gloves coming off. it was fight night at the democratic town hall in las vegas. we're live here on the strip in
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las vegas, a special edition of "andrea mitchell reports" on msnbc. you're an at&t small business expert? sure am. my staff could use your help staying in touch with customers. at&t can help you stay connected. am i seeing double? no ma'am. our at&t 'buy one get one free' makes it easier for your staff to send appointment reminders to your customers... ...and share promotions on social media? you know it! now i'm seeing dollar signs. you should probably get your eyes checked. good one babe. optometry humor. right now get up to $650 in credits to help you switch to at&t. i built my business with passion. but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. i earn unlimited 2% cash back on everything i buy for my studio. ♪ and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands
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go to geico.com. ah! (car alarm sounds) it's ok! some of the most memorable moments from thursday night's msnbc telemundo town hall where the democratic candidate's responses, it's been fractured by current immigration law. >> what will you do about the bars, my husband, i'm an american citizen and my husband was here 18 years. they gave him a 10 year bar. what will you do to bring my husband home? >> what you just described is unacceptable. and should not be happening. >> when you get there, how long, at least i've been waiting six years out of my life. >> i can't, you know, we will use our executive office in
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power as much as we can, hopefully we'll have the cooperation of the united states congress. >> i understand that somebody ask sanders a question because her husband was in mexico. i don't know who asked that question, and i want to tell you, i will end the three an d n ten year bar provisions so you don't have to face that. >> one of the moderators of the town hall, jose diaz-balart, i thought hillary clinton almost echoed to my mind the richmond debate where bill clinton in 1992 reached over to that woman and showed his empathy. because she came on stage, she hasn't been on stage when that took place and she reached out to the woman and gave her more of an assurance than bernie sanders has. >> and, you know, andrea, the
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fact is there are millions of people that live in the united states in a mixed status family household. there are millions of people who worry every single day that a father, a mother, a son, a daughter may not be with them anymore. extraordinary lady that was with us yesterday at the town hall has seen her children grow up without their father. and every single day, she told me afterwards, they ask, when am i going to be able to hug my father again? they have little children in middle school and now high school graduates, never being with their father. >> that was what was so wonderful about the forum. it focused attention on the dreamers, on the immigration issue. the people we've been interviewing out here and following your lead, frankly. and trying to better understand the family dimensions of this. and i think that that was a very compelling moment, and it's
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clearly something that is being discussed. many of the culinary workers who have such an impact about what the turnovut will be are latino >> 10% of the population in the state, the workforce is undocumented. 10% of the workforce in the state of nevada is undocumented. and what that means, there are a lot of people that have a family member. maybe they have the possibility of being american citizens, and therefore can vote and can caucus. so it's therefore the grace of god, go i. and it wasn't just about immigration and not just immigration that the latino community worries about every day but certainly an important aspect. you can have a position on health care, iran, iraq, and syria. but when they deport your father or mother, priorities seem to shift. >> i did talk to a number of
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dreamers supporting bernie sanders. in fact, high school kids who are working as canvassers for him and for them, immigration is the top issue, but it's also his economic appeal. the call for revolution is very resonant with them. >> absolutely. remember, those dreamers have the possibility of living and working in, you know, the law, within the boundaries of the law because of the executive order of president obama, and if it weren't for them, they would have the possibility of hearing that knock on their door and being deported. >> jose, it was just amazing. for me, as someone who has not been in the state for that long, and to see you having those exchanges. i thought we explained a lot to our audience. >> when you bring in history, that's the difference between people like you. that's the difference between the country and it's helpful to remember the past when looking to the future. >> thank you, my colleague. up next, the republican race
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in south carolina. you ain't seen nothing yet. you're watching "andrea mitchell reports" right here on msnbc, the place for politics. >> we can't blow the movement. we have to make sure we get a big mandate. it takes a lot of work... to run this business. i'm on the move all day long... and sometimes, i just don't eat the way i should. so i drink boost to get the nutrition that i'm missing. boost complete nutritional drink has 26 essential vitamins and minerals, including calcium and vitamin d to support strong bones and 10 grams of protein to help maintain muscle. all with a great taste. i don't plan on slowing down any time soon. stay strong. stay active with boost. now try new boost® compact and 100 calories.
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i replaced her windshield... and she didn't miss a single shot giving you more time for what matters most. how'd ya do? we won! nice! that' another safelite advantage. thank you so much! (team sing) ♪safelite repair, safelite replace.♪ south carolina republican primary, the polls showed something of a shift. craig live from spartanburg, south carolina. i think that's your alma mater. must be great for you to be home again. let's talk about the polls. if the nbc news and "wall street journal" poll is correct, we see a softening of the trump lead and possibly jeb bush coming up and does reflect that perhaps attacking the bush family and the campaign today in south carolina was not such a great
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idea for trump. we don't know how real it is. it could be a trend. >> you're right, andrea. we've talked to a number of folks here in the upstate, by the way. in spartanburg county. and all of south carolina, this particular county went for newt gingrich. we talked to a number of voters here who said i like donald trump. i like some of his ideas. he's a bit too brash and keep in mind, as you know, folks in these parts, very polite. he is speaking now. if he heads to paulie's island and in myrtle beach right now.
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tomorrow, he's going to be here in spartanburg. and mr. nevada politics up next. theand the kids always eat sky their vegetables.e.
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but they didn't know they were all tobacco products.e... ooh, this is cool. it smells like gum. yummy! this smells like strawberry. are these mints? given that 80% of kids who ever used tobacco started with a flavored product, who do you think tobacco companies are targeting? do we get to keep any?
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less than 24 hours ago until the democratic caucus here. host of ralston live joins me now. it seems to be at a tipping point. >> i think clinton people are worried. she has like ten surrogate events.
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but it's a caucus. who knows what the turnout is going to be? >> how hard is it to tabulate the result? we see all kinds of questions raised about the iowa caucus. caucuses are very difficult. >> the best case scenario, it starts at 11:00. they hope to get results in the early afternoon and hope to have the whole thing done by late afternoon, but they've already -- the state party tea sent out a memo to both campaigns.
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and if they're concerned about an iowa-like problem. nobody knows if it's as close as iowa but the potential is there. the state party that poured a ton of resources into this whole process is worried everything they've done could go for naught. and then obviously, it's touch and go. and then a combination. you saw it in the town hall on telemundo, the way people talk about immigration here. and then bernie sanders has been
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able to cut through the immigration issue, and then making enough inroads there, i think he has a chance to win. >> i think you're going to have to leave it will. jon ralston. and that does it for this special edition of "andrea mitchell reports" live from las vegas. a lot to look forward to. tune in to msnbc tomorrow at 10:00 eastern for special coverage of justice scalia's funeral. i'll be there with brian williams and others, pete will ya yams. and then chris matthews, chuck todd, rachel maddow and the whole team, follow our show online and on twitter at @mitchellreports. steve kornacki picks up our
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a busy day in politics today. voters here in south carolina begin casting ballots in the republican presidential rye mpr and out in nevada, democrats participate in caucuses tomorrow in the tight clinton and sanders race but before we get to the politics, let's look at washington, dc, specifically at the supreme court. that is where the body of justice antonin scalia lies in repose inside the great hall. hundreds are gathered outside of the court right now waiting to pay their final respects. we have much more on that ahead but we begin now with the 2016
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race. republicans and democrats are in a final frantic sprint ahead of tomorrow's south carolina primary and nevada caucuses. bernie sanders is about to start his first day of the event in nevada, a town hall at a high school out in the silver state and meanwhile, his arrival, hillary clinton, fresh receiving the coveted endorsement from jim clyburn, south carolina congressman, influential member of the black caucus and picked it up earlier today. and clinton now trying to pick up the pieces after this response to a question about whether she has always toll the truth. >> you talk about leveling with the american people. i always try to. i try to. >> some people call that wiggle room you just gave yourself. no, i've always tried to. >> said i will never lie to you. >> you said, i don't believe i
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ever have. >> the republican side, we are hours now from polls opening here in south carolina. the candidates making a last minute push across the state. donald trump just wrapping up in myrtle beach. he brought out his jeb bush impersonation. >> you know jeb bush said donald trump is a gifted, gifted politician. my wife said, i thought he was your enemy. why is he saying that? i said, because he's stupid. i'm kidding, jeb. you're a very nice man. >> and right now, ted cruz is in charleston, with phil robertson from the hit show "duck dynasty" and jeb bush hoping for a final boost to put him back in this thing and bringing out, once again, his mother. former first lady, barbara bush. legacy candidate, hoping to jump out his flagging campaign that politico describes as, quote, running on fumes.
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this is what bush is up against. trump, cruz, rubio. all of them at the top of the pack in the latest polls. the new nbc news poll here in south carolina, trump's lead is slipping. 16 points a month ago to just five points now to ted cruz here in south carolina. we've got a lot to get to. our reporters are in place and we start with the front-runner. donald trump. he just finish speaking at a crowd in myrtle beach. you just heard him with the impersonation. his strongest attack line though was reserved for ted cruz. the texas senator on many issues including the controversy over that doctored photo, the cruz campaign used against marco rubio. >> and then he doctors up a picture last night of marco rubio. i'm not sticking up for marco rubio, but i looked at this picture. marco rubio looked like he was
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about 4'2" and then shaking hands with obama. ted cruz is really a liar, i tell you. >> joining me now on the phone. kelly, we have the new poll. the new nbc poll that shows maybe, maybe, and there's a lot of polls right now but this race could be tight significantly with donald trump perhaps losing that overwhelming lead he had right here. what's the move around the trump campaign? >> the later event today in paul paulie's island and doing the sweep inside now. there's a crowd of a couple of hundred people waiting to get inside. this will be a smaller venue inside a gated community with a golf course next door and the residential area. i can tell you that south carolina voters often decide late and they're now getting a real taste of this campaign.
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with busy schedules for the candidates with the mass dominance of the air waves and the competing ads. it is deciding time. tomorrow, they vote. so closing of the poll numbers, not entirely a surprise but you certainly see donald trump picking the fights strategically, going after ted cruz trying to undercut one of the main planks of wood ted cruz tries to offer voters, and that's this notion he's a trusted conservative and trump is trying to make that case. but if he's not playing by all the rules or those working on his behalf in the campaign operation, just trying to chip away at the cruz reputation. it is classic donald trump with kind of the bravado and the big talk and the punch line that gets a laugh. even if people are slightly uncomfortable laughing at some of the comments, we've seen trump take on the pope, a former president, and his opponents and he does it easily and then
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sometimes backs away a little bit as we watched sometimes later, maybe not so much on this or that, especially with the pope or former president, but when it comes to going after ted cruz who has a real natural constituency here in the bible belt with definitely the evangelical and conservative christian, this is a chance for trump to try to solidify what has been a lee and has been the case of seeing cruz catch up. it would appear that's making trump nervous and getting ted cruz with wind at his back and this is the top spots to be determined tonight when the voters actually get to decide. >> all right. nbc's kelly o'donnell. thank you for that. appreciate it. and let's talk about trump and the rest of the republican feel here with some journalists at liberty tap room in columbia. we have hallie jackson, all over the ted cruz for us.
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from charleston's post and career. the freelance political reporter here in south carolina. let me start with you. people have been looking at this state for ted cruz a while now. they said, new hampshire is not the state but needs to survive here. he needs to come down to south carolina. a lot of evangelicals and he's going to win here. what's the situation now for ted cruz? >> a win would be very surprising for ted cruz given what we've seen with the new polls we've seen. trump has been dominating here and leading the polls by a significant margin. i don't think they get the sense to overtake donald trump but they are playing for second. they are focusing on getting out the vote. the door is is knoknocking and e cruz can play the best. maybe more natural fit for rubio or jeb bush, for example, or john kasich. but he's got pressure to perform
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here. and donald trump also looks strong. >> there are polls all over. i think there's three right now here in south carolina. this gives you a sense of how all over the place they can be. this poll shows may be tight. a five point race here. and trump is slipping. this is the question. the expectations game. with all the talk all week this will be a blowout, if he still wins the state but only three or four points, does that pull over to the category of like a moral win for ted cruz? >> it's definitely good for ted cruz. ted cruz has been hammering people with calls, mailers. he's really going after donald trump here and marco rubio. he needs to make sure that marco stays in a comfortable third and not nipping at his heels. if donald loses a little bit, i don't think the poll is really
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entirely with how people feel. i think he's more in the 30% range but need a strong showing here. that's why he was reminding people, you have to act like this is a tied race. maybe you see "the wall street journal" poll. >> if donald trump is slipping, does it have something to do with the debate, he didn't just go after the iraq war but said the bush administration lied the country into the iraq war. there was a voter, asked last night. did george w. bush lie with the war in iraq? >> you remember saying that? >> i could have said that. nobody asked me. i wasn't a politician. probably the first time anyone asked me that question. but the time the war tastarted, was against the war. and there were articles, i mean, headlines in 2003 or 2004 i was totally against the war and a couple of people in terms of the
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pundits said there's definite proof that trump was against it. >> jeremy, the fact that this thing is still in the air, is this an issue that can give republicans pause at the last minute before checking off his name? >> absolutely, it could. south carolina is a huge military community. people talk a lot about christian evan jell cgelical vo. we talk about, when is the thing that donald trump is going to say, what's the thing that's going to hurt him and he's said so many things. you've been reporting on it for weeks and weeks. he's going after the pope and all this stuff. and these are issues people care about. we haven't talked about jeb bush much and right now, is not expected to do well. but still this is bush country in the sense people say that because the bushes are
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enormously popular, and not to say that there aren't mixed feelings about the iraq war but when you go after the war, whether it was the right thing, these are sensitive issues. so, you know, it's hard to tell, will somebody say, today i'm not going to vote for donald trump but somebody else? it's hard to tell whether that's going to happen, but absolutely, i think it will give people pause because it's crunch time. >> it would be ironic if it was the comments about george w. bush. but that's because we play it, just today, still going after yeb bus >> the bush campaign says, hey, he's rising. he's on the upswing here in south carolina and looking ahead to places like florida if he does stay longer and performs particularly well here. and one of the most fascinating things, donald trump doesn't like the ads.
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the team bush and superpac. it bothers him. and you see him over and over again hitting not just ted cruz but slamming jeb bush and considering where jeb bush is in the polls. >> i've always felt part of that too is he knows how much money, it's preemptive. make sure it doesn't rise up and catch him. but the other things is marco rubio. all the expectations for rubio, he still is sort of, if there is a favorite candidate of the republican establishment, it's marco rubio. he's got the governor's endorsement and tim scott's endorsement. he's barely ahead of jeb bush right now. this could be very bad for marco rubio if that's where he finishes on saturday. >> this poll is almost an outlier. i want to look at the average and use that as the basis.
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i think there's way more momentum, especially with governor haley's endorsement. there was talk if she was going to go for bush or no endorsement in the beginning and then we get this endorsement. someone expecting for rubio, but that is critical for the rubio campaign and even with trey gowdy. that's substantial because he appeals to a different set of conservatives. you get, you know, tim scott. morese sentrist. >> long lost cousins, reunited or something. thank you for joining us. appreciate that. coming up, hillary clinton struggles to answer a question about the truth. >> you talked about leveling with the american people. have you always told the truth? sfwl i've always tried to,
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always, always. >> and we're going to switch gears. and chris jansing joins us from the supreme court. every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. i earn unlimited 2% cash back on everything i buy for my studio. ♪ and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business... that's huge for my bottom line. what's in your wallet? rheumatoid arthritis like me,e and you're talking to a rheumatologist about a biologic... this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain and protect my joints from further damage. this is humira helping me reach for more. doctors have been prescribing humira for more than ten years.
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record this. voila. remotes, come out from the cushions, you are back. the x1 voice remote is here. i am happy to release anything i have when everybody else does the same because every other candidate in this race has given speeches in private rooms including senator sanders. i take a backseat to nobody in being very clear about what i will do to make sure wall street never crashes main street again.
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>> hold the personal event of the day. it will be a town meeting in elko. expected to speak any moment now, and it comes at a pivotal time in the campaign. and then the biggest and most prized indorsment in the state. an then allen university in columbia. it's a bit of a reversal and then back in 2008 after making that, she asked about bernie sanders providing free college education.
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>> i do not believe in free education. i made the white house aware of my disenchantment with the proposal they came up with because i do believe they should make education affordable. but i think more where i see but to make it free, i don't think it's going to happen. >> clyburn will have shore up support in south carolina with a key group of african-american voters to make up at least half of the electorate. and joining me from las vegas,
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she's got the possibility by bernie sanders but also good news with the clinton campaign. >> it's basically a dead heat here, some chris crossing the state. and bringing in bill clinton and chelsea clinton. we are seeing the candidate sharpen their attacks, we saw that in the town hall. and then clinton's campaign is in disarray. that's the type of rhetoric we see heading into this incredibly close caucus fight. secretary clinton picking up the key endorsement in south carolina, it's critical. because if nevada is close or if she loses here, she has to win
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big in south carolina. to do that, she needs the support of a lot of african-american voters so that endorsement by james clyburn is key. she also has morgan freeman out today with a new. take a look. and registered and provided legally. and so would her presidency. get voters to the polls in south carolina but of course today, their focus is on nevada. what is going to be an incredibly tight contest.
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and thank you for that. joining me from charleston here in south carolina is south carolina state senator marlin kymson, a hillary clinton supporter. thank you for joining us. this was hillary clinton in an interview with scott pelley on the question of honesty. >> you know that jimmy carter said i will not lie to you. >> well, i have to tell you, i have tried in every way i know how literally from my years as a young lawyer all the way through my time as secretary of state to level with the american people. >> have you always toll the truth? >> i've always tried to. always. always. >> some people are going to call that wiggle room that you just gave yourself. always try to. >> no, i always try to. >> carter said -- >> have i ever?
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i don't believe i ever have. i'm going to do the best i can to level with the american people. >> senator, i wonder how you hear that. some people would listen to that and say, you done have to try to tell the truth. you just tell the truth. the fact she instinctively, i've tried to tell the truth. how do you hear that? >> well, it's her answer to the question. i think we all stop trying to make hillary clinton something she's not. she forthrightly answered the question. many questions, i'm a lawyer here at motley rice in charleston and many times, questions are posed that are compounded questions. and you have to qualify the answers. i accept her answer as true, and i don't see anything wrong with it. it's her answer, and i'm not here to change it. >> i guess it's part of a bigger
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question. we've seen this in polling for a long time. we've started to see it in polls of democratic voters. concerns about whether hillary clinton is honest and trustworthy. i think that's why some people's ears perk up a little bit when they hear her talk that way. >> what you witnessed and all of the people across this country is a very formidable, capable, experienced candidate handle herself in this nation in washington, dc and she ought to be aplauplauded for her braveryd courage. this lady has been vetted more than any other candidate. i really wish we would start focusing on asking questions of senator sanders about why he's come to the democratic party to run for president, the highest office in the land. he has a 23 year congressional
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record and i don't see a lot of hoopla or level of question on his record. so i applaud secretary clinton. >> senator, if you want to go down that road, he has a 20 plus year record as a member of congress. you're saying he's new to the democratic party. i'm curious, have you looked at his record, what percentage of the time in the 20 plus years in congress did he vote with the democratic party? >> i don't know the answer to that question, but i can tell you. >> he voted overwhelmingly with the democratic party. >> that's great. but the fact is that earlier this year, he filed as a democrat. this is the democratic primary, and what we are looking for in south carolina is people who have been with us, the candidate who has been with us for the longest. i think you saw congressman clyburn, one of the major
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architects of the policy of the democratic party and congress. the fact is that more than two-thirds of the people who have worked with both secretary sanders and both secretary clinton have endorsed secretary clinton. the people you work with speak volumes. we've got to hem down in south carolina we sing and i'm not going to sing it, but may the work i've done speak for me. the work she is doing speaks volumes and i am proud. i am so proud to be a part of her campaign. she's a tough lady. she's the most qualified and capable candidate, and i don't for a minute question that she's dishonest. she has proven to be very well respected, and proven to have integrity. >> all right. state senator marlon kimpson, thank you for the time. appreciate it. turning now to the sanders campaign. he's speaking right now out in
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nevada, but msnbc telemundo town hall, senator sanders continued to face questions for president obama to be challenged in the democratic primaries. >> look, this is a media issue. this is one thing i said on one radio show many years ago. media likes that issue. bottom line is i happen to think that the president has done an extraordinarily good job. i worked with him on issue after issue. >> kasie hunt is in nevada. a short distance from where senator sanders speaks. on the defense a bit last night, what do you hear from the sanders campaign? >> reporter: that's right, steve. we are in elko, nevada. a small place very far from a lot of everything else out here in the west. we're at the utah media market oddly enough.
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his temper flaring up a bit. his impatience with what he believes are the media gotcha questions. it's one of the things we have to adjust to as the presidential campaign ramps up and his challenge to hillary clinton increasingly viewed as more and more serious. i spoke to jane sanders about this very subject. >> i think his weakness is he doesn't stop and recognize that he has to tell people a little bit about himself. give a little bit more about him personally as opposed to what he will do, what he thinks, an analysis of the issues. >> jane sanders talking about the fact that her husband really only likes issue-focused questions. sometimes can react in an impatient way if it's along the lines of something like the political story of the day. i think that's what you saw some
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of there when he was responding to the controversy whether or not he supports president obama, steve. >> all right, kasie hunt in elko, nevada. thank you for that. and coming up, donald trump on iraq. was he for or against the invasion? but first, the boy of supreme court justice antonin scalia laying in repose in washington, dc today. we go to chris jansing at the supreme court next. i think we should've taken a left at the river. tarzan know where tarzan go! tarzan does not know where tarzan go. hey, excuse me, do you know where the waterfall is? waterfall? no, me tarzan, king of jungle. why don't you want to just ask somebody? if you're a couple, you fight over directions. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. oh ohhhhh it's what you do. ohhhhhh! do you have to do that right in my ear?
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ok, but i have 30 acres to cover by sundown. we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. yeah, i was ok, but after lunch my knee started hurting again so... more pills. yep... another pill stop. can i get my aleve back yet? for my pain... i want my aleve. get all day minor arthritis pain relief with an easy open cap. welcome back. it's been a day of remembrance. the casket being brought in the hall. chris jansing is outside and joining me from there. >> reporter: i just walk along the capital street and saw the long line that doubles back look the city block. approaching an hour and a half.
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quite a diverse crowd waiting to pay respects for the justice who served nearly 30 years. we saw families with children first italian american to serve on the supreme court. it was earlier this morning that his casket arrived here and aliep aligned with men and women. more than a hundred of them who served from across the country and many of them who have been successful in their own legal careers, it's going to be interesting to see what happens next, of course, as his family was waiting for him. the son who's a priest, his son paul who said prayers over the casket here from where i'm standing on capitol hill. this is a huge battle brug over his his replacement.
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we learned just a short time ago in the press sweeping the president over the last 24 hours called several members, key members of the senate, the leadership on poet sides. and we do not know details of the conversation, but we did get a clue recently from vice president biden that the president not only plans to make a nomination but it will be vetted by republicans before, and gone through a confirmation process before. one of those people could be someone from iowa which will put chuck grassley in a difficult position but here back at the supreme court, this will continue through the day. at some point this afternoon, we expect president obama. >> thank you, chris jansing outside of the supreme court. thank you for that. and we'll be right back.
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the republican race, the one taking place tomorrow. the poll shows the lead for donald trump's to just five points. following eight points over the last month in this poll and leading cruz just 28% to 23%. cruz, the big benefactor and certainly hopeful that he can win and critical first in the south showdown tomorrow on the democratic side. a poll that was comforting for hillary clinton with tomorrow's nevada contest setting up to be close but here in south carolina, clinton doubling up bernie sanders, 60% to 32%. hoping this state will be the start of her southern firewall and joining us to break down the results.
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the director of the marys institute for public. and there's polls all over the place and one from clemson university that is showing sort of what you're showing here. a tightening race, maybe the trump support dropping off a little bit. tell us what's behind this apparent trump drop. >> we see a falloff dramatically among people who are very conservative and white evangelica evangelicals. south carolina voters are famous for making up their minds very close to the point of voting. coming off the debate last weekend, donald trump hurt himself. numbers are down and the ceiling in which he's had in the mid 30s, it seems to be below 30
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now. at least in the latest numbers. wait to see tomorrow what shows up. >> and a few of these numbers on the screen here. from inside your poll, you see mentioned here among very conservative voters, self-described very conservative. this is a 20 point lead for cruz over donald trump. cowl show you among evangelicals and part of the electorate and basically a dead even race. a couple points ahead but maybe room for cruz to climb if he's losing among evangelicals. >> it was around 8 or 9 points. that as you wrote it as well but the big question is this electorate going to look like the iowa caucus electorate and more evangelical christian or more like new hampshire with the open primary where folks can
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vote in the republican primary and be out there, independents and that's a group that's going to be interesting to watch. the other thing i think we should keep an eye on is marco rubio. he's the preferred second choice of republicans than the other candidates. so there may be late action for him. he's garnered some critical endorsements and we're seeing whether those numbers could get him into the top tier here with trump and cruz. >> it's close but rubio may be getting a kick as we get right to the finish line. >> and that's also something we saw in iowa. the last minute, we didn't really see it until election night. the last minute bump for rubio. so much talk of south carolina as the firewall for hillary clinton. you're seeing a tightening isn't even the word but not as dramatic a margin for her as last time. how safe does this firewall look
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for her right now? >> i think right now, it's pretty safe. the firewall. she was up by 37 points and up by 28 points. her margin is being supported by a huge, sort of the big word again, a number from african-american voters who are over 45 years of age. she's running a substantial 66 point advantage over bernie sanders among that group. if you're looking at race and you're looking at age and you combine them, that's where she's building up this dramatic and significant lead. not so when people are independents, white voters, people under 45. that's where sanders is getting his support but right now, yeah, when you look at the south carolina likely democratic primary electorate, we expect almost 60% to be african-americans and should be a good state for hillary clinton. if it isn't, all bets are off.
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>> i've been down here in south carolina all week. and i've been hearing from everybody all week. donald trump has got this thing in the bag. you heard this in the marys poll. they got this thing right now. thank you for joining us. >> pleasure. next, was donald trump for the war before he was against the war? my colleague chris matthews joining me with clips from the "har ba "hardball" archive. you're not going to want to miss this. . ok, but i have 30 acres to cover by sundown. we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. yeah, i was ok, but after lunch my knee started hurting again so... more pills. yep... another pill stop. can i get my aleve back yet? for my pain... i want my aleve. get all day minor arthritis pain relief with an easy open cap.
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tomorrow, republicans head to the polls and big news on the front in the state. we are just learning from one of our nbc news reporters in charleston who informs us that within the last hour apparently,
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congressman mark sanford, the former governor of this state. once a rising star in the national republican party back in congress for the last several years apparently endorsed ted cruz for president. mark sanford who was neutral and potentially last minute for ted cruz. we have more on that as we learn more about it. meanwhile, across the country in nevada in the silver state, democratic voters take part in the first in the west caucuses tomorrow. that state has a reputation for attracting people looking to hit the jackpot. the same can be said for the candidates. here's msnbc's jacob soboroff. >> people come to look and get
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rich quick in nevada. since they moved after the new hampshire primary, silver state has become a can't-miss stop on the campaign trail. >> you see any presidential candidates come through vegas? >> not yet. >> what about the pawnshop? >> no. haven't seen any. >> have you seen any presidential candidates in your limousine? >> why aren't you driving any presidential candidates? >> i think hillary and bernie are coming soon, right? check that out today or tomorrow. >> hillary clinton hit the nevada jackpot raising 580,000 bucks from nevadans in 2015. for a time, grew up in vegas in
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2015. 3500. >> who would it be? >> donald trump. >> and how much would you give him? >> whatever is legally allowable. >> over $2,000? >> i would. >> you must do a good business. >> that's the name of the business. >> winning a fund raising battle is not just the e llectoraelect. >> elvis, are you going to caucus? >> i believe i am. >> are you going to caucus in the election coming up next week? >> yes. >> who are you going to caucus for? >> mr. trump. >> are you going to caucus for the election? >> that's the democrats that caucus. >> republicans too. >> oh, do they? i have a get a little, on tuesday. it's on tuesday. >> all right, and jacob soboroff joins us now. great piece.
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you get to see a wedding chapel and elvis impersonator. that's not something we had in iowa or new hampshire. but talk about the fund raising bit of this. you get a piece see in iowa. tell us about your piece there. >> reporter: like nvrg theveryt this campaign. you got donald trump at the bottom of the barrel. he's not accepting my money from donors or special interests, as he says, and bernie sanders is losing the battle here, yet he's surging in whatever campaign you look at, if they're reliable. bernie sanders is doing well and so is donald trump. i guess it's not what you expect as we've been seeing this whole cycle. >> all right, jacob soboroff out there on the vegas strip. you have a sun assifun assignme looking at those caucuses. we'll be right back. this is humira helping to relieve my pain
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>> and i'd really appreciate one of those hugs you've been talking about. >> ohio governor john kasich right there hugging a supporter last night at an event in clemson, south carolina. it's a moment that has now gone viral, being described as one of the most human moments of the 2016 campaign, and here's what kasich had to say about it today. >> for some reason people feel safe in telling me stuff, and maybe they feel like, okay, this guy has got some power, some authority, so if i tell him, it will make a difference. i don't know, but i know that there is a bigger message than about me. forget me, it's about all of us having to pay some more attention to some other people. i think what we're finding is people just feel alone.
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>> and next hour, my colleague thomas roberts is going to have an interview with the young man who kasich hugged last night, and thomas joins us now. thomas, the campaign trail is always full of surprising. here's a moment i don't think anybody was expecting. >> reporter: these are the kind of real things you look for, where you want to see the heart of the candidate. this was a moment for john kasich, and people love this. this went viral, so rhett smith is going to be our guest in the next hour. he went to clemson to go see his favorite candidate. and he's attracted to the governor's humbleness. it's a wild week with candidates going from place to place to meet a lot of people. last night i went to a packed house at the marriott and i had a chance to catch up with his favorite supporter, nikki haley, but i did speak to her, and this is what she had to say about what this optically means for
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the gop. governor, is this the face of the new gop? >> this is nethe new face of th gop. >> you said it's like a beniton ad. what did you mean by that? >> that means we have young, positive supporters who are going to grow our party. >> it was a great moment with her. i also had the opportunity to speak with senator tim scott and marco rubio as well, and we'll have all that for you in the next hour. i have to say for all the rallies i've been to, steve, this one captured the most electricity and had the most with the collection of almost political superfriends with seeing nikki haley and trey gowdy and tim scott all there with marco rubio, and they're bouncing around today trying to get as many people feel vested in marco rubio and why they need to vote for him tomorrow. >> if ever a candidate had the
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market cornered, it's marco rubio. >> is this a ticket? are we getting a forecast of a marco rubio-haley vision. >> i know in washington there are a ton of republicans who want that. we'll see if the voters in south carolina do. we'll look for that next hour. thanks for joining us. thomas is going to pick up our coverage after the break. i'm steve kornacki live from columbia, south carolina. be sure to stick with msnbc tomorrow night for live coverage of the results and the caucus. we'll have those tomorrow afternoon. you're watching msnbc, a place for politics. to folks out there whose diabetic nerve pain...
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south carolina. you've heard me talk about the match-ups for days now, cruz-trump, bush-rubio. we've got a broader picture taking shape for the heart of voters of democrats and republicans. think of it like this, new guard versus old guard. you take the hopeful in marco rubio, the 35-year-old slowly but effectively yanking the darling away from the likes of jeb bush. and nikki haley, a rising star sure to be in the conversation for vice president, and don't forget about her political future in 2017 and beyond. consider the fact that south carolina is shaping up to be a contest of a silver medal with donald trump. the candidate has been feuding with the pope and defending himself with comments he made during an interview on the
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howard stern show during 2002. that last sentence is one you won't hear if we're talking about candidate john kasich. this old guard isn't limited to the republicans, either. it is safe to say that hillary clinton is a member of the establishment, but that's helping her today, just a day from the democratic caucus in nevada. a powerful early endorsement here in south carolina from the highest-ranking black member of congress. >> my heart has been with hillary clinton from day one. >> are you hoping that this endorsement is going to seal a victory for hillary clinton and the vote in nevada? >> well, to be totally honest with you, i was on the phone with a few of my friends in nevada. you may know that for the last four or five election cycles, i campaigned a lot in nevada. i have quite a few friends there, some of whom urged me to come forward now, expressing
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that it may help them in nevada. i certainly hope so. >> we will talk about why that endorsement is so pivotal for hillary clinton ahead of nevada and its caucus and also ahead of south carolina democrats voting next week. but we do want to start on the right and with donald trump, on defense today reacting to a newly uncovered howard stern radio interview from 2002, and it appears to contradict his position on the iraq war. we're going to play that and following his response from the "today" show this morning. >> are you for invading iraq? >> i guess so. i wish the first time it was done krecorrectly. >> the question was asked in 2002 long before the war started. by the time the war started, i was against it and when the war started, and for many years i've been against it. i said iran will toeltally take
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over the mideast, and that's exactly what happened. >> hardball with chris matthews talked with donald trump about this, and chris, explain what the team was able to dig up from this old interview of donald trump? which characterization of good or bad for iraq is it in donald trump's opinion? >> i think trump was evolving, to use a modern word, on his views. back in 2002, and this is in all fairness to donald trump, this was in the fall talking to howard stern when people like the vice president of the united states, dick cheney was saying they had nuclear weapons that were dishonest. we have talked to the cia who briefed the vice president and he said they never had nuclear weapons. people like trump, civilians, if
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you will, non-politicians to go along with the need for the war. however, once we got into that war, and the first year we had him on "hard ball," university f pennsylvania. and i asked him about the war, and here you begin to see his sort of business sense, his chops as a businessman. he said, you know what, spending $780 billion on this war rather than infrastructure at home is going to hurt the president down the road politically. let's watch him say that. >> i think his bigger problem is going to be what's happening in iraq. i believe the economy is doing well, i think it could get better, but lots of surprises out on the horizon, and what's going to happen with iraq, what's going to happen with the world situation, that could be the bigger problem that president bush has. >> this was an elective war. the president thought we had to do it, he made a judgment call, he took us into iraq. do you think he will reconsider that judgment as the costs rise?
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>> i don't think he will. he's a committed guy, he's committed to that whole situation, and i don't think he really will reconsider. i don't think he probably can at this point. other people will, and you'll find out at the polls whether or not those other people are right. you see more and more doves if you call them doves. the question is whether we should have been in iraq in the first place. i don't think this president can do anything about that. he's on a course that has to stay. >> what's the economic impact? is it the cost factor of about 100 billion a year for the infrastructure rebuilding or is it psychological? >> it's psychological, but it's also tons of money being pumped into iraq. you look at states like california where they can't afford school systems and we're giving $780 billion to iraq and that's just the beginning. it's a tremendous cost to this country, what's going on there, and again, we're getting some very, very unpleasant surprises in iraq, and hopefully something is going to be done about it quickly. >> let me ask you about the
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democrats. i noticed a slight, or other people have noticed a slight shift to the war rather than the economy. is that smart? >> i think that's the only thing they can do. the economy is good. new york city is having its best year, perhaps, in real estate. that's a very big indication. in california real estate, the same thing. the country is starting to do well, so i think the whole shift is going to be very much toward the war. >> well, thomas, there you see he solved the problems for the president in terms of selling a war that was costing so much overseas, $100 billion. he said 87 when we could be spending at home. he wasn't too vigilant on the real estate bust. he didn't see that one coming. >> what talking during this interview, was trump flirting with trying to be a politician? that's his one defense against these old claims about whether he was for it or against it,
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whether he had the foresight with iraq. was he flirting with political aspirations during that interview? >> i can only tell you, thomas, i don't know how many cycles a lot of us were punked into thinking he was going to run that year. he would talk it up, get a lot of press, new york press, of course, in the tabs that he might run, so i think he always thought about running, especially going back to 2003. but he comes to us here as a kind of middle of the road business guy who, when the b bugles were blowing and nick webb talked to him, he went with them. but he said we need to be spend ag lot of money at home. so i don't see a lot of politics, but when we had him on this show, he said, this is probably what the democrats are going to run on in 2004, and they didn't exactly do that. john kerry really didn't make the war an issue. he was more of a scentrist
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democrat. >> chris, do you see this as a hi hiccup for trump at all, or will he barrel through this and take on south carolina? >> most republicans take it as a religion that george w. bush kept us safe. even though 9/11 did happen under his watch, and i do believe if it happened under president obama's watch, they would have gone after him like you can't believe. but they gave him a bye, not the same as they gave fdr a bye on pearl harbor. some people do think it was his fault that it happened on their watch. they were willing to hear, however, as trump was starting to intimate there, that it rack war was a mistake. it was a bad mistake for the country to get involved in the mideast whatever, the chaos, the civil warring.
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i think most would say that's smart business thinking. but when you go back and say republicans lied to the country, that they're somehow reliable for 9/11, and that gets into their political religion. they really do believe that bush kept them safe and i believe that's a treacherous road to take. i think it's a wash. he'll have a squeaker down there in north carolina. i don't think this is a wash. i don't think it is at all. >> we'll know tomorrow night after the results come in after prit marry here in south carolina. great to see you ready in nevada. we'll go to kelly o'donnell in pawleys island, south carolina. the vatican has come out with a clarification about the remarks. >> reporter: they have, and i'll tell you about that in just a moment, but just to set the scene for you, thomas, we've had a chance to talk to some of the
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voters you see behind me who are going in slowly to the event that will happen a little later this afternoon. what i was struck by is how you don't have undecided voters in this crowd. person after person we spoke to, unscientific as it is, said that they were a decided trump voter and had been regular republican voters in the past, often going for a more traditional or establishment candidate. but real clarity among the people who are coming out here, and i have not found anyone here who had seen him in person previously. so there was a real draw for people who have been animated by what they've seen on television about the trump campaign and earlier states and wanting to be here in person. one of the issues, certainly, a couple of them did acknowledge that there were times when what trump talks about might make them pause for a moment, but it was not sufficient for them to change their view about his strengths, his negotiator, and many said he talks tough. when the talking tough got him
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in a little trouble when the vatican was involved. as you know, the father asked him about trump, he responded. then today at the vatican, a spokesperson for trump said, this is what we already knew. he said what he said on the basis of what he was told about trump's positions, hence, giving him the benefit of the doubt. so that is a sense of what the vatican spokesperson has to say about trump today. thomas? >> kelly o'donnell reporting on pawleys island. with the vatican recalling the remarks saying it was not a personal attack on trump. our question is, do you agree with the pope's comments on donald trump? pulse.msnbc.com. we'll check the results in the next hour and showcase those coming up. storpt i want to head to las
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vegas where the two candidates had a baurn raising ahead of quinton quinton's. sanders defended his criticism of president obama. >> there is one of the two democratic candidates here who actually ran against barack obama. it wasn't me. overall, i think the president has done an outstanding job. and the idea that there can be a primary wihere different ideas get floated and debated, i don't think that's terrible. >> why are you hesitant to release transcripts or audio-video recordings of those meetings in order to be transparent with the american people regarding the promises and assurances that you have made to the big ban banks. >> let me say this. i am happy to release anything i
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have when everyone else does the same. because every other candidate in this race has given speeches to private groups, including senator sanders. >> reporter: joining me now from las vegas, nevada is one of the moderators jose diaz-balart. great hosting last night, and i know that was a lot of juggling between you and chuck, and you really had a great, informative town hall with these candidates. were candidates really do anything to change an up decided time, especially on issues of immigration and the economy. >> i think they both acknowledged a lot tonight. talk about his desire to see kprens active immigration reform, what that would look like. what we would veto or not.
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>> he was questioning and there were rebuttals from the people who were there. hillary clinton was also very clearly it would a pop that she would have within her first 100 days in office. these are things they hadn't, because immigration, immigration reform, weren't on. the economy job, minimum wage, what to pay for college. what exactly does free university mean? so many issues that the people were able to ask these candidates about. that's what made this kind of unique last night, the fact that a broad spectrum of people, thomas, all colors, all
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denominations, all religions, were able to be represented and their experience. that young man had asked hillary clinton about whether she would finally release the transcripts from her speeches. and later it was very poignant when he said, hillary clinton, you broke my heart when you publicly said marriage should only be between a man and a woman. the possibility of hearing people talk about real experiences and real emotions is what i think both candidates were able to do in their own way very well. >> they did a great job, especially dealing with complex issues, also dealing with complex questions, some that came in spanish because you were actually translating those questions live, especially from the one woman who was concerned about the issue of doca
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students. >> yes. the doca students. there was another lady who is married, has children. her husband was deported to mexico six years ago, and she is a u.s. citizen, was going through the paperwork to try to get him legalized. that was not successful. and to talk about the fact that her little girl has grown up without her father. another daughter who was in middle school is now graduating from high school. and afterwards, thomas, she said that every single day her daughters ask her mother, when am i going to see poppy again? when am i going to be able to hug him again? those realities are almost
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always lost when you ask about those and crunch numbers. others ask, when am i going to be full members of this society? i was great to have my close friend chuck todd with me to help me out. >> congratulations on a very impactful night. jose diaz-balart reporting for us in las vegas, nevada. we are grounded in south carolina and the republicans with ted cruz gaining ground right now. take a look at this. he's within striking distance of donald trump. just five points separate them. and a second place finish would be very strong for him. obviously first place would be even better and cruz's first choice. joining me now for a visit between cruz campaign stops, hallie jackson. >> this is a pleasant time, tom. >> we have a big endorsement for
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cruz. is it going to make a difference in south carolina? >> mike sanford endorsing him. potentially. cruz is someone not especially well liked in congress. he's picked up some endorsements recently this week. senator mark lee was campaigning with him yesterday, although not endorsing him. so he is picking up some congressional here, but there is a question mark as to how impactful it will be, considering you have someone like a marco rubio out to governor nikki haley and tim scott, people who are out in national politics. ted cruz played the expectations game well in iowa because he sort of came in first even though he had been trailing donald trump in the polls. i think his campaign believes they are playing the expectations game here. i don't think they have an understanding that it will be
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very difficult to overtake rubio. >> he's up right now? >> not, but to nevada now where jose is, where the democrats are right now. he's out there with a new ad hitting donald trump on federal lands. let's watch a little piece of it here. >> 85% of nevada is owned and regulated by the federal government. and donald trump wants to keep big government in charge. you, the people in nevada, not washington bureaucrats, should be in charge of your own land. if you trust me with your vote, i will fight day and night to return full control of nevada's lands to its right frightful ow its citizens. count on it. >> the cruz campaign likes to talk about how they're appealing to a broad segment of the republican electorate, but to
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tea party and libertarians, it feels like that's where it's aimed in nevada. south carolina has always been seen as a place where ted cruz can and should do well, so now the pressure is on him to actually follow through. >> if you can punch the ticket and get to super tuiasosopo. this is the first primary in one place, because i know this isn't going to last for long. >> marco rubio is literally stretching across the state with five separate events. gabe gutierrez is following marco rubio in hilton head, south carolina. i know there was an event for rubio this morning, and four after that, i think? the potential for rubio to cancel un, but is that back on the books?
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>> they scheduled one for 10:00 p.m. tonight, and they had to cancel that flight. he literally took the stage here in hilton head. he is really trying to build on this momentum. the question will be is how much of a difference will it make here in south carolina. we have been speaking with several voters here, many of them who are undecided, but a lot of them do support marco rubio here. we're going to keep our voices down so as not to interrupt the event. what is your name. >> laura bailey. >> where you from? >> i'm from right over the bridge. >> i see you have a marco rubio sign. why are you supporting marco rubio? >> because of his focus on the family is the biggest thing for me. >> what impact, if any, did governor nikki haley's endorsement have on you? >> i was already a supporter of marco rubio, but i feel like she affirmed my vote. >> his critics has said he has issues with his immigration stance, and they've been
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attacking him on his record. does marco rubio have enough experience, if your view? >> i do think he has enough experience. i think that his experience in the senate is going to prove to be a valuable asset to marco rubio. >> you have a lot in your hands so we'll let you go. this group over here says they're undecided. ma'am, i'm sorry to interrupt, but what's your name? >> my name is jennifer. >> and your name, ma'am? >> carol. >> you guys were undecided here, right? >> yes, we were currently undecided. we are leaning towards jeb bush. >> why is that? >> we saw him at a rally and we've been following the debates and the news cycles throughout the whole entire process, and we enjoy jeb bush's stands on the second amendment, bringing the federal government smaller, limiting it, bringing the power back to the states, which is really what i think our founding fathers wanted in our country. keep it within the states, limit the government, the second
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amendment right, which is our only property guaranteed to us in the entire constitution which is the right to carry a gun. it's a personal piece of property. i like his stands on immigration. more so -- go ahead. >> you're here at the marco rubio rally. why are you here, just checking him out? are you committed to jeb bush or still -- could marco rubio sway you? >> what we're looking at right now, of course, we're looking at the poll numbers and we know that jeb bush is somewhat down in the polls and we know that marco rubio is somewhere third. the first two candidates in the lead are not two candidates i believe i would vote for. >> so this could be about electability for you? >> it will be. >> for you, ma'am? >> it's the same for me. >> your father over there, he's committed to donald trump. >> yeah. >> how is that working out within the family? >> donald trump, the next president. >> but you're here at a rubio rally. >> i'm just with them. >> family ties, right? thank you so much.
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good to talk to you. i'm going to send it back to you, but marco rubio trying to convince voters in south carolina to vote for him. this could be a crucial race for him, obviously trying to finish in the top three, making it a three-man race between himself, donald trump and ted cruz. tom, i send it back to you. >> gabe gutierrez, thank you. we saw marco rubio criss-crossing the state. also we have jeb bush out today with his mom, former first lady barbara bush. he is pulling out all the stops to try to secure a top three finish here in south carolina. he's in a statistical tie for third place with marco rubio 13 to 15% for vet latest on the trail. let's check in with kerry sanders, kerry following the bush camp for us today and joins us from spartanburg, south carolina. how are they spending the last few hours here on the campaign trail for jeb bush skmiz teand ,
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kerry? >> reporter: there's very much the bush brigade behind jeb bush today, his wife, two sons, and as you mentioned, barbara bush. it's very much a family affair. the only one missing is mr. french, and if you're an old enough person to remember that, you know what i'm talking about. what they're doing right now, they started in spartanburg, they made their way to greenville, and now they're making their way to center, south carolina where they will hold a rally. jeb bush is trying to mobilize what he seems to be saying is the thinking voter, the voter who is stopping to consider what is at stake here for the country and for, he says, the republican party. when he was speaking to a crowd of about 200 here earlier today, he said among the things that voters cannot do is just chase popularity. >> donald trump has never shown any interest in anybody other than himself. the two candidates that are
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gifted speakers, marco rubio and ted cruz, have done nothing in their past to show they could make a tough decision. they're good at their own ambitions, and they're talented to do the job. they're far better than hillary clinton and bernie sanders, don't get me wrong. but is there anything in their past that says they have the metal to do this job, that they have the backbone that won't cut and run? >> so the question now for the jeb bush campaign is how will they do in south carolina? because the polls suggest that things are not going well, remember, there was a time when jeb bush was the establishment candidate, the one that the republican party seemed to believe was likely to become the nominee. there is a general sense that everything is on the line here in south carolina, and depending on how things go on saturday, it may determine the future of this campaign. thomas? >> kerry sanders reporting in spartanburg, south carolina. a gentleman over my shoulder,
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you just said "poor jeb" because he's got to fire? >> got no fire. >> got no fire. we're seal how it all goes down here in south carolina. the polls open at 7:00 a.m. tomorrow morning, while in nevada, the democrat caucus begins at 2:00 eastern, 11:00 a.m. pacific. coming up next, the moments you rarely see on the campaign trail, but they could have a huge impact on voters. the university of georgia student who shared an emotional moment on stage with john kasich. his incredible story of finding hope and a hug in a presidential candidate. 80% of women say a healthy lifestyle is a priority.
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himself. and then a few months later, my parents got a divorce, and then a few months later, my dad lost his job. and i was in a really dark place for a long time, i was pretty depressed. but i found hope, and i found in the lord and my friends, and now i've found it in the presidential candidate i support, and i'd really appreciate one of those hugs you keep talking about. >> pretty emotional there. john kasich with this emotional and real moment with one of his supporters. that student, jeff smith, drove over an hour to see his favorite candidate in person. apparently jeff didn't plan on sharing that story, and jeff, a political science major at the university of georgia, joins me now. thanks for making time for us. that was such a moment that went viral. a lot of people felt connected to you and the words that you spoke to governor kasich.
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can you share with us about what prompted you to share that story? >> well, i didn't plan on sharing that story at first. i planned on asking him a question about how he planned on maintaining an optimistic campaign, especially in, like, south carolina where it gets pretty dirty. but when he told me i was going to be the last word, i figured i can either ask him something that i'm sure he's been asked before 100 times, or i can share something from my heart and hopefully, you know, it can connect with him and with other people. and they can see him how i see him, as not just a politician or a governor but as a human. >> you know, you might have really moved the needle when it comes to his polling here in south carolina and for voters tomorrow as they go to vote. and governor kasich talked about that moment with you. i want to play what the governor had to say about that, brett. take a look. >> for some reason people feel safe in telling me stuff, and maybe they feel like, okay, this guy has got some power, some
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authority, so if i tell him it will make a difference. i don't know, but i know there is a bigger message than about me. forget me, it's about all of us having to pay more attention to some other people. because i think what we're finding is people just feel alone. >> so, brett, you were certainly not alone. your story has resonated with so many people via social media. what did the governor say to you, if you don't mind sharing, when you had that hug? what did the governor say in your ear? >> he told me the lord will give you strinength if you ask him. he just said, i promise you, he'll give you strength. it was something else. >> what's the feeling uyou have now after that experience? >> i'm a bit overwhelmed, but at the same time i'm touched because i've gotten a lot of e-mails from people that go to my school. i had an e-mail from a guy in
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california, from d.c., who had similar things, and just another thing, one of the guys, immediately after i said that at the rally, an older man, he came and gave me a note with his name skm and his number, and he said, if you ever need anything, just to talk or meet up, i'll meet you. he said, just give me a call. it's good to see people being people to people, if that makes sense. >> it really does. you put the politics aside, and that's a moment that i think we're all going to remember from this campaign cycle no matter what happens tomorrow. brett, thank you for delivering that moment to all of us. you're not alone, and we really do appreciate you talking to us here today on msn brbc. thank you, brett. >> thank you, thomas. later on we're going to update justice antonin scalia. he is lying in wait in
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welcome back, everybody. mourners continue to line the great hall where justice antonin scalia lie in repose. president obama and the first lady plan to pay their respects from this afternoon. pete alexander joins me from the supreme court. remind me of the formal plans for remembrance for justice scalia. >> reporter: you see the line behind me, thomas. that's the leading edge of it. people have been lining up since the doors opened up to the public today around 10:00. the line comes down those steps behind me that lead up to the supreme court, and then halfway around the court building, people waiting to pay their respects to justice scalia as he lies in repose here. president obama will be by, all the supreme court justices were here earlier today, members of the scalia family may return to the court building to have some time with the president, and then tomorrow the funeral services at the massive basilica of the shrine of the immaculate
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conception here in washington, the largest catholic church in north america, one of the largest in the world. justice scalia's son paul said a brief prayer this morning before the doors were opened, while members of the court, justice scalia's former clerks and members of the family were present, and he will celebrate the mass tomorrow. he's a catholic priest. one of the nine scalia children here today, and he will say the mass tomorrow. there you see him in his vestments in the massive, ornate great hall, and just behind him would be the courtroom itself draped in black in honor of justice scalia. >> we can only imagine how difficult that is for paul scalia to perform those services as we're witnessing. thank you, peter williams, report from the supreme court. we'll have much more on the coverage and what it means to remember this legal giant from the supreme court. the funeral tomorrow starts at
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10:00 a.m. eastern. coming up, nevada is hosting the first of the caucuses. hillary clinton and bernie sanders, they are duke ing it o for support from members of the culinary union. we're going to find out, are they going to serve an endor endorsement or not? business incentives, the lowest taxes in decades, and university partnerships, attracting the talent and companies of tomorrow. like in utica, where a new kind of workforce is being trained. and in albany, the nanotechnology capital of the world. let us help grow your company's tomorrow, today at business.ny.gov frodoers don't stop. wake up, every day is a chance to do something great. and for the ones they love, they'd do anything. sears optical has glasses made for doing. right now, buy one pair and get another free. quality eyewear for doers.
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a change we seek for this great country will not come easy. we need a real fighter, and i believe hillary clinton is that fighter. >> there we have hillary clinton picking up a key endorsement here in south carolina today with congressman jim clyburn deciding to back hillary clinton, doing so before the nevada caucus and before the south carolina primary. this is a brand new nbc news
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poll showing hillary clinton with a 20-point lead over bernie sanders. so why endorse so early? because it's a whole different story in nevada with the caucuses there. we have the latest poll showing hillary clinton with a one-point lead. both are making their final pitches today. bernie sanders held a town hall in elko, nevada earlier. later he is holding one in henderson. hillary clinton there also today, she's having a rally with bill and chelsea in las vegas. i want to turn to jacob soboroff. he is there where he connected with voters. are you getting a sense that tomorrow sets a new record for the democrats, or are people not really paying that much attention? >> reporter: it's interesting, thomas, the big x factor is going to be the culinary workers union which turned out in huge numbers at these casino conferences in 2008. on the republican side, they're
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coming up on tuesday. i went to the caucuses and they were jam packed with people who had never been there before. one group excited about the candidates, and they're racing here for electoral support. we did a little digging. welcome to las vegas. people from all around the world come to nevada looking to get rich quick, and our very own u.s. presidential candidates are no different. since they moved the caucus earlier on the election challe -- calendar in 2008, it has become a must-stop place for the votes. what about this pawn shop, any presidential candidates stop in here? >> nope. haven't seen any. >> reporter: have you seen any presidential candidates in your limousine? >> none. >> reporter: why aren't you driving any presidential candidates?
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>> nobody came to us. >> i think hillary and bernie are coming soon. i might check that out today or something, or tomorrow. >> hillary clinton hit the jackpot last year raising $580,000 for 2013. that is four times what bernie sanders made and pulling out every candidate. marco rubio, who actually grew up in vegas, made the most. $305,000. >> if you were going to pawn something and donate that to the presidential candidates, who would that be? >> donald trump. >> how much would you give him? >> whatever is legally allowable. >> over $2,000? >> i would. >> you must do a good business in this pawn shop. >> that's the name of the game. >> even pollsters are are reluctant to predict what's going to happen.
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elvis, are you going to caucus? >> i believe i am. >> are you going to caucus in the election coming up next week? >> yes. >> who are you going to caucus for? >> my friend mr. trump. >> are you going to go out and caucus for the election? >> actually, that's the democrats who caucus. >> republicans, too. >> do they? i'll have to get a little -- >> tuesday. i gave you the update. it's on tuesday. thomas, fundraising is not an indication of whether or not people are going to turn out. polls aren't an indication of whether people will turn out. it's basically a big unknown what will happen here on saturday and again on tuesday. the campaigns are doing everything they can to turn out their voters. we'll just have to wait and see. >> jacob, i don't think anybody has heard, "elvis, are you going to caucus" being used as a question in a long time. when it comes to bernie sanders, i saw this e-mail or at least this chance that people can sign up for the revolution and get a ride. bernie sanders is saying, if you need a ride, we will get you to the caucus on time tomorrow.
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>> reporter: yeah, there you go. they are offering -- like i said, thomas, they're doing anything they can. rides. i'm sure they'll bring out elvis here in some capacity. it's no holds barred. >> well, we know elvis is for hillary, so they've got that on lockdown. jacob, good job. jacob soboroff reporting for us in las vegas. you have to weigh in on a question, the question being, do you agree with the pope's comments on donald trump? the vatican came out to clarify that the pope's words were not a apparently attack, but 52% of you agreed with the pope's comments, 48% said no. pretty strong ticket there. we'll be right back after this. ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪
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there you see on that stage
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right under the flag for south carolina, the governor, nikki haley, signing marco rubio signs. that's marco rubio on the right-hand side of your screen. on the left he's shaking hands with people who came out to see him stumping today. they've been in kind of a political power group of what the new face of the gop looks like, with tim scott on board and trey gowdy as well. but there was a lot of people that showed up there in hiltonhead and there are more who will show up in pawleys head, south carolina today. they almost had to cancel because of issues with plane travel to get there, but we have word that schedule is back on track. so if you're a gen-xer or older, you might remember, and it
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appears that marco rubio is peaking right at the right place, hoping to show americans new optics about the forecast of the gop party. >> senator, is this the face of the new gop? >> part of it, absolutely. >> part of it? governor, is this the face of the new gop? >> this is the new face of the gop. >> you said it's like a beneton ad. what do you mean by that? >> that means there are young, passionate fighters who are going to do what it takes to grow our party. >> what is south carolina going to do tomorrow? >> we're going to show people what we're made of. >> what happened to your knee? >> i fell at a marco rubio event. it's one of the many wounds i'm willing to take. >> is south carolina going to deliver for marco tomorrow? >> i think marco is going to do very well tomorrow. we'll wait and see what the voters say. marco rubio is real. we're looking forward to the results tomorrow.
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i'm expecting a surprise finish. we'll see what that means. >> why don't you think donald trump will do well tomorrow? >> i'm focused on marco rubio. the other candidates will go down. >> there is little time left for the gop voters in south carolina to make up their minds, and i spoke to them this morning on why they have or have not decided about marco rubio. what's that golden moment that's going to say, you know what, i've made up my mind? >> the golden moment for me would be how do we beat the democrats? that's what i want to hear. i want to hear how we're going to beat them. >> what do you think about the chatter of nikki haley on a ticket? >> i think that would be wonderful. i'd love to see her as the vp. >> have you made up your mind who you're leaning toward? >> i'm leaning toward dr. carson and marco rubio. i've watched dr. carson's gifted hands, so he has some education in the health care industry, so he knows the problems, he knows the pitfalls, and i think we've
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been going the wrong direction the past seven years. >> trump and cruz alienated so many people on both sides, that if they get elected, i don't think they'll be able to get anything done. >> there is a mixed crowd of folks turning out for marco rubio. we'll hear what he said to say. while find out exactly how they cast their votes tomorrow. that's going to do it for this hour of campaign 2016. tonight the nig"nbc nightly new with lester holt. don't go away. fight it! with jublia. jublia is a prescription medicine... ...used to treat toenail fungus. use jublia as instructed by your doctor. jublia is workin' it! most common side effects include... ...ingrown toenail, application site redness,... ...itching, swelling, burning... ...or stinging, blisters, and pain. oh!! fight it! with jublia! now that's a red carpet moment!
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also the final stop of my tour across south carolina, my home state, just a day before its republican primary. any moment now, any moment now donald trump set to take the stage. he's on stage right now. there he is right there, pawleys island, just south of myrtle beach, the gop frontrunner addressing a crowd there. donald trump looking to hold a lead here in south carolina which has shrunk to just five points, according to the latest wall street journal poll. you can see it there. he has a five-point lead over ted cruz. trump leads, though, in double digits in two other polls. meanwhile, the democrats, hillary clinton picking up a key endorsement just a couple hours before here in south carolina. congressman jim clyburn announcing that he is backing the former secretary of state. >> campaigns are and should be about the future. and i believe that the future of the democratic party and the
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united states of america will be best served with the experiences and know-how of hillary clinton as our 45th president. >> i spoke to congressman clyburn just a few moments after that endorsement. i'll bring you part of that interview in just a bit. democrats in south carolina vote a week from tomorrow, but the focus of that race, nevada. that's where residents will be voting tomorrow night. bernie sanders and hillary clinton faced off in a rally last night in nevada. >> i've won one, he's won one. that's why we're here in south carolina. >> no one in this room no matter who you're supporting should be proud we have one of lowest voter turnouts on any major nation on earth. nobody should be proud that we
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have republican governors and legislatures who are working overtime trying to suppress the vote. >> we've got a team of reporters fanned out all over south carolina, but we start this hour with donald trump, again, the gop frontrunner, speaking right now in pawleys island. let's listen in. >> i think hopefully we're going to do very well tomorrow. we just had the emerson poll. emerson is a great, great poll, and one of the most accurate. i think they were the ones that got it really right last time or the last two times. the emerson poll we got great numbers with for south carolina. they really did a great job last time, so we're honored to have that. we were at 35 or 36, and i think second was 19 or 18. we had a big, big lead. but, you know, we just assume we're tied. because it's much better to do it right. as young guys you have to assume you're tied. in fact, assume you're down. that's even better, right?
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we assume we're down, but we have to get out and vote, because if we don't get out and vote, there is no movement, no anything. when it started, it started as trade because it used to drive me absolutely crazy to watch these incompetent, stupid deals where china would consistently outdo us at the trading table, and we use people who are political hacks, we never use our right people, we don't use our great businesspeople. we have the greatest businesspeople in the world. we use political people, people who get there because they make campaign contributions because of some politician, and it would drive me crazy. i was a very big contributor, and i know the power of a contributor, and all these politicians i'm running against, look at cruz, look at what he gets from the oil industry and other industries. i look at jeb bush, the head of this campaign, his pharmaceutical, woody johnson of
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johnson & johnson. the largest drug purchasers of the world. they're not going to bid out the drugs. we don't bid them out. i just found out -- a friend of mine who is a doctor called me and said, we don't bid out drugs. >> there you have donald trump talking a little bit about why he is ahead in most of the polls. but also trying to stamp out a fire caused by a recent article in buzzfeed which uncovered audio from a 2002 howard stern interview in which trump tells howard stern that, yes, america should invade iraq. listen. >> are you for invading iraq? >> yes, i guess so. i wish the first time it had been done correctly. >> that statement there directly at odds with one of trump's major selling points to voters, that he was smart enough to oppose the war. earlier today trump appeared to say that his anti-war decision came after that howard stern
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interview. >> i said don't go to iraq, and i said it strongly, and i said it loud, by the way. they like to say now, well, maybe he didn't say -- i was with howard stern before the war, many months before. the first guy asked me about iraq, and i said, yeah, sure. then i started looking at it. before the war started, i was against that war. >> kelly o'donnell is following the trump campaign. she joins us now from pawleys island. kelly, good afternoon. >> reporter: hi, craig, good to be with you. we are outside that event and we're probably with several hundred people who have been waiting to get in, and this was advertised as limited seating, so they were not the lucky ones to get in the door. the crowd had kind of snaked the grounds here on this resort. a couple things that struck me, craig, a number of them said this would be the first time
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they would see trump in person, which is somewhat different than you get in the early states of iowa and new hampshire where voters sometimes get a chance to see a candidate more than once. also, in talking to these people, this was a crowd very much in support of trump, not a group shopping among the candidates, if you will. so very strongly supportive of trump already, and when i raised some of these issues that have been part of the news conversation the last day or two, and talking about some of the controversies that sometimes come donald trump's way, even that was not enough to sway those who are supportive and strong in the lane for trump. and they basically said they understand there will be things that he will say sometimes that are perhaps going further than they, as a person, would, or they get into some trouble, and they still think he has a strength about him and an outsider status that they liked. i had expected maybe i would find some undecided voters here on the eve of the voting in south carolina, but in our
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unscientific sampling of the crowd, that was not the case. this was a group of people who are excited to see trump, and they're getting a chance in kind of a smaller venue than trump often will do to hear what he has to say. there is a golf course right around the corner and he began talking about the fact that he is a golf champion at one of his resorts, and that seemed to bond with some of the regular golfers who are in the crowd inside. craig? >> kelly o'donnell traveling there with donald trump along pawleys island. she indicated they are known for some fantastic golfing there. donald trump addressing some supporters there. kelly, thank you. we'll come back to you in a little bit. ted cruz getting a last-minute endorsement. the congressman mark sanford making that announcement a short time ago. he made that announcement during an event. hallie jackson covering the cruz
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event in columbia. i think i saw him and he made no point of saying he would be making an endorsement. any idea why that changed? >> reporter: when you look at some of the congressional endorsements that ted cruz has gotten, those were not unexpected. those were people you would think would naturally be a fit for cruz. this one was sort of interesting. it came out today. it's something cruz is touting as he's out, by the way, not just with politicos, but with phil robinson from "duck dynasty." it could potentially be a help for cruz in south carolina as he goes up in this battle for second place against marco rubio. as you know, he's out there with nikki haley, tim scott, trey gowdy. so cruz can say, listen, i have some crud, too. turn to me.
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his campaign has done more than a thousand door knocks in the last couple weeks. they feel confident about their ground game, their organization in south carolina. they're particularly focused on the upstate area. he's been to myrtle beach and charleston, he's heading up to greenville. i believe the focus for him is upstate where he believes he can bring together that conservative core unlike those coastal areas. for cruz it's a key strategy as he heads into the south, into the sec primary states, and into nevada as well, an area where he's trying to make a play against donald trump. it's fascinating, what we're seeing between him and marco rubio here, craig, is this battle that's amped up between the two. you've gotsniping at the spokespeople. it's exciting. we're 24 hours out here from finding out what's happening in the first in the south primary,
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craig. of course, you're not at your alma mater, not at columbia today. >> we keep missing each other. hallie jackson there, downtown columbia. the aforementioned marco rubio touring the state with south carolina governor nikki haley who endorsed him a couple days ago. also campaigning with the state's junior center, tim scott, trying to build up some momentup ahead of tomorrow's primary. gabe gutierrez following the rubio campaign. gabe, rubio and the rest really trying to push this idea that they represent a younger, more diverse field of republicans. how is that playing across the state today? >> reporter: hi there, craig. yeah, you're exactly right. nikki haley at this rally. she wrapped it up by saying these are the new faces of conservatism.
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marco rubio, along with governor nikki haley, and tim scott were speaking to voters. we've been speaking to voters as well. let's ask a few of them. how is this playing? what's your name? >> julie mckenna. >> what do you think. i was very impressed with marco rubio and nikki haley. we've always been a big fan of nikki haley. so i think it's awesome. >> you're supporting marco rubio, right? >> definitely. >> the criticism on him has been his lack of experience. yes, he's younger, yes, he's fresh, but does he have what it takes to be president? >> i definitely think he has what it takes. i don't think he's too young. i think his support of the military will help keep our country safer, and i'm just a big fan of him. i think he'll do a great job. >> craig, yes, of course. the military is undecided. what's your name?
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>> teresa constranos. >> and you? >> lisa richardson. >> we were talking about this war between ted cruz and marco rubio. they're really going at it in this primary. who are you leaning toward most and why? >> it's real tough, i'll be honest. i can relate to mr. rubio's upbringing and having come from an american family and seeing the american dream truly lived out. most important to me are the religious values of faith. i think that's the core of our nation that needs to get back on track, and i think the rest have found a place. so both guys strong on that. you know, politically speaking, those are the most important things for me. >> thank you so much. ted cruz is really hitting marco rubio hard over immigration. the rubio camp has been battling with him on immigration.
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where do you stand on the issue and is that important to you? >> i do think both candidates are strong on that. i am really concerned, too, just about the state of our nation as far as protecting our freedoms. i believe ted cruz is a little more outspoken with protecting our religious freedoms and what our country was founded on. i think a lot of people are forgetting that. i do also like rubio's stance on immigration. so i'm leaning toward ted cruz right now. >> thank you so much for talking to us. this is a battle shaping up against marco rubio and ted cruz. barnstorming the state, they had to cancel one event earlier because of airplane mechanical problems, but they rescheduled it for later tonight, a sign of just how important every voter is here in south carolina. back to you, craig. >> it's hard to believe there could be a single undecided voter in this state.
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every three minutes there is a campaign ad. you have to wonder how people don't have enough information to make up their mind. >> up to the last minute. >> today on "morning joe," the candidates skirting around what he will do if he has another poor showing this time right here in south carolina. >> we're on the ballot in every state. my intention is to go forward, but i'm not focused on sunday or monday or tuesday. i'm focused on pri afriday and saturday right now. i'm going to make the case that i've been on the case since june 1 and that i can change the culture in washington, d. c. >> the governor has three events today with his mother, former first lady barbara bush. bush has a lot of catch upping
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to do. he's behind trump, behind cruz, behind rubio as well, all of this due to our latest polling, the wall street journal poll. nbc's kerry sanders just a hop and a skip and a jump away following the bush camp. he's in easley, south carolina. >> hey there, craig. jeb bush is not talking about his standing in the polls. first this morning in spartanburg we met people for breakfast and later in a gathering in greenville. but clearly it's on the mind of vote voters. i have spoken with those gathering with him and i asked them about whether they were to cast a vote for jeb bush, is it a wasted vote? some are saying, yes, we're going to stick by our candidate, he's our man. others are thinking about the catalyst as they look at the polls. interestingly, as you noted, he's traveling with his mother today. not just his mother, his two brothers, non-political
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brothers, his son, his wife. it's very much a bush brigade out there and certainly drawing attention. then you open up the microphone to those in the crowd. you're never quite sure what's going to happen, and of course there was that moment, the most endurable moment, really, when nine-year-old david lott decided to ask jeb bush a question. >> what is your family's tax plan? >> it sounds to me like you're a policy man like me. do you believe in policy? i do, too. we need to stick together, because policy matters. ideas have consequences. so my tax plan would call for lowering rates, eliminating deductions, simplifying the code. >> reporter: and, of course, there you go, little david lott, who really melted the hearts of everybody in the room. he was actually doing a grade school project where he's keeping track of all of the
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different candidates, and so this was his question. certainly a moment for him. and quite frankly, i was impressed, a little nine-year-old boy asking a very serious, tough question to a candidate. and he held his ground. craig? >> we should follow that kid. we should follow that kid, kerry sanders, he's going to be something. thank you, sir. kerry sanders in easley with the jeb bush campaign. his founder of the paladian group. and i thank you both for being here. let's talk about jeb bush. jeb bush trotted out his brother earlier this week, former president george w. bush. he has his mother there today. he has spent close to $1 million on this campaign. if he finishes fourth or fifth tomorrow, can he continue? >> you heard him a while ago.
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he made it clear he's in it for the duration. i think florida is the key state, because with senator rubio and governor bush, i think whoever comes out of there will really be the dominant person and in fact the nominee if it's not donald trump. >> do you think he risks losing his home state, or does he drop out before that? >> conventional wisdom say he's going to stay through florida buzz his numbers are actually better in florida than senator rubio. again, this is all in play. as you know, it's all about momentum, and as this treks along, whoever seems to be ahead seems to trend. >> justice antonin scalia lying in repose today in the supreme court. president obama and the first lady expected to pay their respects.
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my colleague chris jansing is at the high court. chris? >> reporter: thank you very much, craig. right now we have learned the president has indeed left the white house with the first lady, coming here to the supreme court to pay their respects where the former justice antonin scalia, the late justice, has been lying in repose since 9:30 this morning. he gave quite an eloquent statement about justice scalia, although they disagreed on so many things. following his death he called him a brilliant legal mind who had influenced a generation of judges and lawyers and students, and someone who has dedicated his life, frankly, to the practice of law. the president himself, of course, a lawyer and someone who was an instructor in constitutional law, but so many of the decisions that justice scalia was a part of were opposite of what the president would have liked, from the hobby lobby to bush v. gore to his vote against obamacare. today he will come, he will pay
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his respects, he will not go tomorrow to the basilica in washington, d.c. for the funeral. some people have criticized that, said it would be an opportunity to show some outreach, some bipartisanship when washington really needs it. however, the administration will be represented by vice president biden and jill biden, both catholic, as antonin scalia was a lifelong candidate and the family is their personal friends. i'm joined. this has been a somber day but also one of great tribute. the line that went down the capital has stretched for an hour, hour and a half wait. >> and you've seen the line behind us. it goes part way around the court building and has been here since the court building was open to the public. when the president gets here,
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he'll fire up the caskets. when this last happened, when a former supreme court justice was given the honor of lying in repose in the court's great hall, justice scalia escorted president and mrs. bush. that was at the lying in repose ceremony for the late chief justice william renquist. it will be a brief thing we will see, but we believe members of justice scalia's family has returned to the supreme court. it began this morning with a prayer by the scalias' son paul. this will not be president obama's first time. as president to the supreme court, presidents. perhaps because of that auk wafrd moment at the swearing-in.
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he'll be returning here to some of the court. of course, a very different day today. >> you mentioned paul, one of justice scalia's son. . they read a poem for a brief ceremony, but very firm for this court, whether they're liberal or more conservative, have formed a close bond with many of them, especially with elena ginsberg, enjoyed the opera with justice ginsberg, occasionally took them there before the supreme court. he's just now arriving here in the supreme court.
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a huge and elegant room and founded by a bus to former sweeps. and the catapult where the president was in the capital after his assassination and that on loan, that podium, from the congress. >> we don't see the president arrive here. he comes in on the other side of the building. the court faces the u.s. capitol so it's the opposite side of the view you're looking at on the right-hand side of your screen. there is an entrance to the court that goes into an underground garage. that's the typical way that presidents and mbz of the court come to work every day. and he'll be brought in there and come up to the great hall, which is from the supreme court. >>. you would go up those ceremonial steps, in which the great hall is located and also the supreme court room itself which is just
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off to the left out of the view of the camera we're looking at right now. that's where the courtroom is, just to the left, and we don't know whether the president will come in that way, but just to the left of the portrait is where the entrance to the courtroom is. it's covered in a -- right now in a black crate in honor of justice scalia, so is the bench. the supreme court is in its mid-winter break now. it starts from late january until next monday. the judges actually have a conference today, scheduled closed door conference, to talk about cases, so this will be their first time all together since their esteemed colleague justice scalia died. they were all present this morning, chris. >> we saw briefly that portrait you mentioned painted in 2007 by artist milton shanks on display
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as people pass by that casket. some things were very important to justice scalia, a webster's dictionary. they a photograph within that painting of his wife maureen to whom he was married for 15 years. this is a place of sio it's certainly appropriate. this is the seventh time that a former justice has been given this honor of lying in repose in the supreme court's great hall. this is from earlier today when the justices were present for the prayer. you see elena kagan, elena
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ginsberg, chief justice john roberts. justice scalia would have sat in between those two when he was on the court. clarence thomas and then the other two justices of the court, they're just coming into the frame now, serena bryer and sonja sotomayor. there were several dig adignita that came through, and this was symbolically interesting for two reasons. one was justice scalia was on that court, and in the middle of the picture you see patricia molette andsand sherene dawson,
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names that were pensioned as a possible replacement for justice scalia. there was that moment here about an hour and a half ago when they passed by, chris. >> and that line that has been really just keeps regenerating despite the cold today, throughout the day many people lining up well before the doors were open at 10:00 this morning. as i walked it and spoke to a couple people a short time ago, you could hear conversations about the loss. at least in one case i heard them debate a very specific court case. they were families, they were mothers who were bringing their children who clearly see this as something historic and see this as an opportunity for them to take part in a piece of history. and some people just said, i came because i could and i wanted to show my respects. not necessarily all people who feel that they would agree with all of his decisions, but as
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someone who was a towering figure for almost 30 years on this court. in that line, our ari melbourne is standing by. ari? >> reporter: hi, chris. we are here. you can see part of the motorcade still remains, as far as we can tell. the president would still be inside. the only point i would offer thinking about the reflections you and others have shared, the president right now is obviously paying respects on a personal level. it would be unimaginable not to note at this time that this is a president who has tangled repeatedly with the supreme court over the scope of executive power. indeed, one of the cases before, what is now an eight-person court, regards the president's choice on immigration to use his executive authority. indeed, in addition, we all remember the cases regarding the affordable care act, obamacare multiple times where this
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president had one view of the law and there was a test before the court. so you can imagine in addition to the personal tribute that the president and others paid today, there was also the historic incidence, and they will write about this for years to come, the president paying respect for a man he obviously held in high regard for service to his country, but also came down on different sides of not only policy but really of law, the president himself a constitutional law professor who studied justice scalia's writings, so these were two men that were lagerheads, but who had deep feelings about the constitution, and constitutional interpretation, chris. >> thanks so much, ari, and pete, if there was a quick confirmation of a replacement which no one expects, it would not happen quickly enough for some of the key cases that are
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coming up, really, within the next month or so. >> right. we are now at the busiest part of the supreme court's annual term after this break when they now rush to finish their business by the end of june. we will soon hear a case sponsoring tough new abortion plac places. in addition to the questions involving other key issues the administration disagreed with the court on. this, however s a dis a day of symbols. this is a day to honor a former chief justice and a former branch. it's probably the best way they come here. >> an amazing sense of symbolism. . we're looking at the right at earlier today when they had the
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service. talk a little bit about his relationship with the rest of the court? in fact, there were opinions, we talked about his colorful writing, his dictionary, how carefully he chose his words. there were some of those opinions that were very pointed as those who disagreed with him, some would even say scathing at times. clearly, he was not a justice who either orally or in his writing shied away from letting h his dissents be known. >> justice scalia's dissents were not for the weak of heart. he wrote for the future hoping his views would someday be voted in. you don't have to be schooled in the law to understand what he's saying. they're lively, they're vif i had -- vivid.
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ruth bader ginsberg, idealogical opposite, said the strength of his dissent, not really the language but the intellectual reasoning of him, caused those in the majority to go back to work and make their opinions a little better or a little stronger. but it was her view that they made the rest of the justices better. justice steven brier is the one that spoke. and he said he brought an energy to the court with a grayer day, and he paid his respects in the hour after his death, he called him a larger thanl life figure. he would go to mass, and he would go to, as we were speaking earlier, the donuts and coffee afterwards.
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he didn't have an entourage with him. he went to a loft in chinatown, an area of this city that has changed markedly when he started going there, and also his home in mclean, virginia. >> you may be wondering, if the president is here now, where is he? my guess is he's talking to members of the scalia family, which he came back. i'm sure this is probably something the president wanted as well, to have some time with them, and that would also be a. we assume it will be one of the more senior members of the court, but we don't yet know that. the court's staff didn't seem to know, and perhaps that's something that will be arranged at the last minute here. but the justices are still here in the court building after
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their conference, which would have ended just a short time ago. they do these conferences on sunday, which will. it will tell. even though we don't have. . most of the decisions probably 60 to 70 or 804%, it's not guided work 5-4. >> his family, like you said, was there earlier told. just a short time ago, in the "washington post," one of his sons christopher and got out to
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talk, obviously in recent days, about the final days of their father. justice scalia was someone who said often, when they were young children, he didn't have a lot of time with them. he didn't go to their ball games, and he didn't go to their school events. what christopher scalia wrote was, my most vivid memories with my dad are around the dinner table. it's true we often discussed law, history and politics, but dad made sure our kitchen would never be mistaken for a salon. four uneducated individuals got it more right than an attorney. if anyone said "um," my dad would break out in a chorus of
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"umms." it's worth pointing out 98-0 was the vote on antonin scalia, first italian-american on the court. that would never happen today. >> no, and when you ask him about that, he would point out that, yeah, the other two were jake garner and luke, but those days are gone, unanimous voting for court justices. it's something that he and the other current judds decried, that the process had become so political. and as the president contemplates who should be another justice, my colleague, adam liftak, in the "new york times" pointed out the other day that justice scalia talked about what he thought the court becoming way too ivory tower and
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i insular, so many justices coming from law schools, not elected to office like used to be the case. but it seems a safe bet that, again, those days are gone, too. presidents are so careful now when they go back through the list of nominees. the one noted exception on the current coat is elena kagan, who was in the justice department but is not an appeals court judge. but that is a notable exception. >> i want to read a little more what christopher scalia wrote. by the way, he clearly inherited his dad's sense of humor because it is a very funny and very charming remembrance. he said, my dad had a rich tenor voice, perfect for reading stories to his grandchildren. he had 36, by the way. that's my addition, not christopher's. his rendition of "the night
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before christmas" was a long tradition. for leading at parties, he led on the piano, and the longer country drive the better. >> in terms of leading sing-alongs, he did that at the court, too. there is a tradition that just before christmas, they bring in a big tree at the supreme court decorated, and members of the supreme court staff and all the clerks of the justices gather, and someone usually leads them in song, and for many years that was antonin scalia. >> there is also a wonderful story, and a friend of his from the church, i believe it was the one in chinatown, wrote about this, how -- and here comes president and mrs. obama to pay their respects. so we'll pause for a few minutes and pick up after.
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is. about two minutes inside the supreme court's great hall, chris, which is about the normal thing for these events.
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there's been seven of them throughout history, and that's about the same amount of time the president spent when this happened in 2005. >> following his death, he came out mak made a brief statement saying, he shaped a profound landscape, and he will probably be one of the biggest thinkers who served on this supreme court. he was the cornerstone of our democracy, the rule of law. >> i should say the people you see in this picture are former law clerks of justice scalia. there have been about 100 of them here in the court and they rotate every half hour in this position of honor at the casket. >> we saw very moving earlier today, leading up to the bronze doors at the front of the supreme court two rose of men and women in dark suits, many of them law clerks coming from all around the country, some of them
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who have gone on to significant legal careers of their own. and as we talked about at the time, some of them even liberal because he liked a good argument. and he liked to have people, when he was writing his arguments, bouncing the ideas off of him and trying to give him the opportunity to make his case even stronger. >> well, that was certainly his tradition when he started in the appeals court and when he was up here at the supreme court, too. i'm not sure he continued that all the way through his time on the supreme court, but he did like a good argument, and he liked people around him who told him he was right. >> so president obama paying his respects there, who now will leave and head back to the white house and head back to a fight that will be going on across the street in capitol hill where luke russert is standing by. and luke, he is looking to name a supreme court nominee who we understand has passed republican support over the last 24 hours, has called the four key senators
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who will be involved in perhaps bringing this before the senate, two leaders of the senate judiciary committee and the two leaders of the senate on the republican and democratic side. where does this all stand right now, luke? >> reporter: well, that's right, chris. the wheels are in motion for president obama to name a successor to justice scalia within the next few weeks. the white house spokesperson josh ernest saying today at his briefing that president obama will be working through the weekend, having stacks of binders with biographies, files of some justices. the press secretary wouldn't lead on as to who those files were about, only saying there were more than two. so president obama going to do h his due diligence. there have been a lot of names thrown around here on capitol hill, and there is a fight among the republican party right now as to whether or not even give this a hearing. the expectation is that
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republicans are not going to allow for a vote to come forward on the senate floor over this pick, but even just to have a hearing. if president obama were to select even a moderate republican such as the governor of nevada, brian sandoval, one that's been thrown around by harry reid, that might put republicans in a difficult position. if he were to throw around loretta lynch, someone who has already been through a campaign battle, that might brought out, and it might put republicans in a precarious situation, and this will play out on capitol hill, chris, between now and july. congress doesn't have. politics is completely overtaken. any weather of words that gets done on capitol hill, and
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politics, especially the presidential race, will inject i itself in this fight. the chairman says the next supreme court justice should be given to the people, and next year president obama says, hold on, i have almost a year left in my presidency. it is my constitutional prerogative to name a successor, and that is what he intends to do. that appointment is so important, because not only does it have ramifications for the supreme court, one for his election. the other comfortable nks, they're going to be in the middle of a huge partisan battle. it takes a very strong-willed, mentally prepared person for that. that's why i'm fascinated as to who the president may select, chris. >> and we have found people in the middle of those kinds of battles. robert fort comes to mind, any
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number of others. but i want to go out to the thousands of people who have been waiting in line today to pay their respects. ari is already on that line. ari? >> reporter: hi, chris, that's right. we've been out here since early this morning and the lines are have become very long. it stretches way back. these are people waiting hours in the cold, and if you hold the camera back here and you stretch all the way, you'll see out and around the other street. the line also goes that way. that is what they're coping with, including right across the street, obviously, with folks who want to pay their respects. what i want to do now is walk a little bit down this line, chris, because there are, of course, regular citizens and all kinds of people who gather, but also dignitaries and those part of the political life of washington. one of those is former congressman dan lundgren. i wanted to ask you what brought you here to wait in line and pay
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your respects today. >> well, i'm unable to attend the funeral tomorrow at the basilica, so i thought i needed to pay my respects to a great journalist and a great american here tonight. >> how will you remember justice scalia? what stands out with his work? >> if you were lucky enough to be in his presence, he was a great storyteller, he was an intellectual heavyweight, and he loved to debate issues. so you could argue with him about an issue and he delighted in that. i had the privilege as attorney general of california to argue a case before the u.s. supreme court back in the '80s, and i remember how sharp he was then. very, very concerned about the use of language and what words actually meant. i think that was one of the greatest things in terms of the constitution. he would try to figure out what the words mean because he
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figured that was the only thing that made you honest with the american people. >> they did a question about which judge made the most laughter. no surprise judge scalia out in front of everyone else. what made him stand out ahead of everyone else? >> you had to know your issues, you had to know your cases, but you also had to have a very good ear for language. if you did not understand words properly, he made sure you did once you were there, and that's a tough thing to do when you're in public, particularly when you're arguing before the u.s. supreme court. >> right, and we've heard other litigators say you don't want to land on the wrong side of judge scalia on a hot bench. thank you. that's one of the examples as i throw it back to you, chris. we'll show you the length of this line, the public interest and the public fascination as people want to come and wait to pay their respects to justice scalia. back to you, chris. >> ari, thank you so much. and apparently you didn't want to get on the wrong side of justice scalia in touch football, either.
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i keep going back to his son christopher's op-ed, essentially, i guess it would be more of a memorial he wrote to his dad in the "washington post." he said, for many years we played a touch football game at thanksgiving. we called it a scalia bowl. it generally went well for about 30 minutes before someone, usually dad, would interpret improperly a rule. many of the games ended up with someone stomping off the field in disgust. luckily no media to cover the event. >> enough scalias to attend. >> apparently, with the nine children. when he was giving a speech, and he never wanted his speeches to be recorded or published, and we're in another fight involving that in politics right now. some people associated with him apparently confiscated the tape recorder of a reporter and he actually wrote an apology and said he believed in free speech.
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apparently she got her tape recorder back at some point. so as you, pete, someone who has covered this court for 23 years, what will you remember most about justice there, because he was such a large, looming presence. and of course, the expression here is that every time there's a change, a new justice, it's a new court. it's going to be this current court for a while. we'll see how soon we get that new court, but it's going to be very different without him. >> it will, indeed. pete, thank you so much. my thanks to luke russert and ari melber and the president returning to the white house now, and to a battle over whether or not he will be able to name a replacement and get him or her confirmed to the u.s. supreme court. i'll send it back to craig melvin now, who continues our political coverage of a different kind in spartanburg, south carolina. craig? >> chris, thank you so much. and a quick reminder, we will, of course, have much, much more tomorrow here on msnbc, as this
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country remembers justice antonin scalia. special coverage with brian williams, that's tomorrow morning starting at 10:00 a.m. meanwhile, back here in sparkle city, as we call it, upstate south carolina, spartanburg, south carolina, on the campus of wallford college, my alma mater, more on that in our next hour. but right now, let's go back to our panel, karen floyd and also sarah mccamada, political reporter with the npr. we were talking as we watched some of the proceedings play out there over what the fight over the president's ability to nominate a new justice, what has that done to this race here in south carolina. what have you seen with regard to that specifically? >> well, picking a conservative who will nominate conservative supreme court justices has been a talking point for republicans all along, but since the death of justice scalia, i think we've seen that intensify. it's kind of upped the ante, so to speak, especially with texas senator ted cruz, who has gone after donald trump on this issue, questioning his past
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record on issues like abortion and questioning whether or not he's a true conservative who would nominate conservative justices. >> let's talk about donald trump for a minute here and let's talk about the news of the day, karen. and we should note, the spartanburg marriott, which i can see from here, about a quarter of a mile away, this is where they're having their victory party tomorrow night, trump headquarters. a lot of talk today about the war in iraq, what was said and what was not said years ago. i want to play something that donald trump told chris matthews in november of 2003. this is about seven months after the invasion of iraq. let's play it and let's talk about it on the other side. here it is. >> i think his bigger problem is going to be what's happening in iraq. i believe the economy is doing well. i think it could get better. but lots of surprises out on the horizon. and what's going to happen with iraq? what's going to happen with the world situation? that could be the bigger problem that president bush has. >> this was an elective war. the president thought we had to do it. he made a judgment call and took us into iraq.
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do you think he'll reconsider that judgment as the costs rise? >> i don't think he's going to. he's a very committed guy. he's committed to that whole situation, and i don't think he will really reconsider. i don't think he probably can at this point. other people will. and you're going to find out at the polls whether or not those people are right. you see more and more doves -- if you call them doves. the question is whether or not we should have been in iraq in the first place. i don't think that this president can do anything about that. he's really -- he's on a court that has to stay. >> again, this is some sound that we found from chris matthews, from that show. earlier today, we had the howard stern interview that surfaced where donald trump appeared to be in favor of the war. the trump campaign responding, saying, that interview with howard stern was done before i became anti-war. what impact, if any, is all of this iraq war talk going to have on the election here in south carolina tomorrow? or will it have an effect at all? >> i don't think it will have much of an affect. i think donald trump's
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constituency or voter base is almost impermeable at this point. it's a group of folks that are very disorganized, organic, they're populist, they're not controlled and they love the fact that he is saying things that is harnessing anger and frustration that they're all feeling. and consequently, i think that these are just kind of the bare-knuckle politics in south carolina. lots of this back and forth is happening, and at this point, i think that the die is cast and tomorrow the votes will be had. >> one of the things that has struck me most this week, as i've made my way around the state, evangelical voters in south carolina, roughly 60 to 70% of evangelical voters, that's what we'll see tomorrow at the polls. that's the base that shows up to vote more often than not in gop primaries here. they love donald trump. and they love a guy, and i'm not just talking about the fact that he's on his third wife and says things sometimes at rallies that we have to bleep out on cable, but he's a guy that doesn't necessarily fit the mold of your
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typical, your typical gop candidate, who would appeal to a evangelical voter. >> it depends on the evangelical voter. that's a big group, and there is -- there are differences within evangelicals. i think, certainly, the most conservative evangelicals are really motivated by these issues, like abortion and same-sex marriage, and are probably looking harder at a ted cruz or maybe a marco rubio. at the same time, donald trump has tapped into this populist energy, the sense among many voters that something is wrong. and i think that swept up in many evangelicals as well. >> sarah, you covered a lot of the candidates as they made their way around the state. in terms of ground game, in terms of operation, who's the best, who's the worst? >> i don't know about best or worst. i know ted cruz has a strong ground game. he's repeating many of the moves that succeeded from his playbook in iowa with a lot of volunteers, a lot of on-the-ground retail politics, these small campaign stops. donald trump certainly has a strong organization and a lot of energy, as we've mentioned.
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and jeb bush has a long history in this state. his brother is very popular here, and he has a strong organization as well. albeit, a different kind of an organization. >> he spent a lot of money in south carolina. i know you don't like to play pundit, but i'm going to ask you to play pundit. >> oh, man. >> what's the headline sunday morning out of south carolina? >> whoever comes in second will be the headline. i think we know who will come in first. >> right now it's between ted cruz and marco rubio. >> you know, that's to be determined. there's such fluctuation in these polls right now. who might consider, perhaps, governor bush or even, believe it or not, dr. carson, who because he's not in the fray of going bart, has a trajectory that's positive. who knows? >> karen floyd, sarah mccammon, thank you so much for being with me for the full hour here in spartanburg, south carolina. we're approaching the top of the hour here on msnbc. again, we are live from wallford college. this is, again, upstate south carolina, we're maybe 10 to 15 minutes away from greenville, south carolina. you're looking at the beautiful
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campus here on north church street in sparkle city. we'll spend some more time in our next hour talking about this campus, 1864. we've been around a long time. we'll talk about wolford and spend some more time talking about the south carolina gop primary. that is just, oh, how many hours we talking here, guys? 15 hours away. and a quick reminder. be sure to stick with msnbc tomorrow night for live coverage of the south carolina republican primary and nevada democratic caucuses, as well. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. a quick break.
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for my pain... i want my aleve. get all day minor arthritis pain relief with an easy open cap. go, go, touchdown!, go... ♪ choir and harp music. this place, it's the best-kept secret in football since... hey, how did he get in here?! and with toe nail fungus! fight it! with jublia. jublia is a prescription medicine used to treat toenail fungus. use jublia as instructed by your doctor. now that's prime time. most common side effects include ingrown toenail, application site redness, itching, swelling, burning or stinging, blisters, and pain. you ready to fight it? ask your doctor if jublia is right for you. y'know, i look great in purple. and a good friday afternoon to you from a sunny spartanburg, south carolina. my alma mater, my home state, much, much more on why we are here in just a bit.
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republicans, of course, heading to the polls here in the palmetto state, just 15 hours from now, democrats go to caucus in nevada tomorrow, as well, and it is a close one there in nevada. a one-point difference there. but hillary clinton picked up a powerful new endorsement a short time ago. south carolina congressman, jim clyburn, the highest ranking african-american in congress. this state's lone democrat in congress. we'll be talking to jim clyburn in just a bit. we'll also be talking to voters here throughout the hour, as well. just a day before the republican primary. a number of the presidential wannabes have also been here, to my alma mater, wolford college. this is a college that has been here since 1854. the building behind me, there, the old main building, actually built by the hands with the help of former slaves. every student who's ever gone to this college has had a class inside the old main building,
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myself included, of course. we're going to talk with some students here, as well. my first journalism professor was here just a bit ago. i couldn't convince her to stick around. not sure what that says about what she thinks of me. but again, wolford college here -- here's some students! take a look at that. we found some students here at wolford college. so as we are one day away from the gop primary, we'll spend some time talking to those students and we'll spend some time as well talking to our team of reporters, fanned out across the state. in that spirit, let's start with donald trump, who's on defense today. on defense, reacting to that newly uncovered howard stern radio interview from 2002. it appears to contradict the message that he's been repeating, that he held an early opposition to the war in iraq. here's that interview, followed by his response this morning on
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the "today" show. nbc's kelly o'donnell, covering with the trump campaign in pauley's island, south carolina. kelly, we'll try to get that sound up in just a moment, but what is the trump campaign saying about this back and forth over the war in iraq? >> reporter: well, one of the things we can say is that here at pauley's island, donald trump sort of turned the page, making some different news. in his conversation with voters here, he came up with an idea to say that the public should boycott apple over the issue that that tech company is having, fighting with the federal government over whether or not they can help to unlock information in the phone that was used by one of the san bernardino killers. and trump sort of had a moment where he said, he just thought of it.
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and that he believes that the public should boycott apple. so that's one of the ways that donald trump is able to keep in the news cycle and keep moving forward, even when he stumbles into something that might be controversial, perhaps. he just talks about something else. so when it comes to the issue of terrorism, he speak out quite a bit here today, talking about the fact that he believes very strongly that that company should help the government. he didn't have all the facts quite right about how that process works. the government is trying to get apple to help them to override the system by -- there's a feature in which it would be automatically erased if you attempt to get into the phone too many times. they're seeking some help on that, for that one particular phone. apple is resisting that, and there's a whole controversy about that. so that was part of it. and of course, he talked about bowe bergdahl, at great length here. and he also talked about some of the issues that were on the minds of voters here, who asked about the republican establishment, for example, and how would trump be able to try
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to bring them along? answered questions about entitlements and about jobs. he also took a few shots at the air-conditioning company, carrier, for their plans to move out of the u.s. and so, it was in many ways, classic trump, hitting on big notes, getting a warm response and even a humorous response from members who had come here, voters in this community who had come to see him in person. but earlier today, what we can tell you about this discrepancy of trump talking about the iraq war back in 2002 in a howard stern interview, at that point, he had said that maybe he was in support of the invasion for the first gulf war, the iraq invasion, but also then saying, you know, really, he was ant politician at that time. he was an entrepreneur and was not well-versed on all the issues and wasn't always being asked about that. and yet, trump also says that part of his national security credibility in this race is to
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say that he was against the iraq war, executed by the bush administration, from the beginning. and so he can try to point to the time difference between the stern interview and when the eventual invasion happened in 2003, but it's a bit murky. and when i talked to voters here, craig, about some of these issues, i did not meet anyone in our unscientific sample who was bothered enough by any of those sort of discrepancies or the issue with the pope, who trump today said the pope's a great guy, and said that after a vatican statement, that sort of softened the disagreement, that he seems happy with the pope. so, it was one of those sort of scatter shot moments, when trump can hit on a lot of hot topics. the voters are thinking about, the media is talking about. and he said, i don't want your money, i want your vote tomorrow, as his closing pitch to voters here in south carolina. craig? >> kelly o'donnell for us there on pauley's island. kelly, thank you. nbc's hallie jackson has been trailing the cruz campaign for
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some months now. and halley, you've got to think, with just 15 hours left in south carolina, that this is the kind of thing that the cruz team will probably be using a fair amount in their stump speeches over the next day or so. >> and we've seen them using a lot of trump's comments against him, as this race really appears to tighten. at least if you look at sort of our new polling that came out today in south carolina, and from what campaigns are talking about, where they see this race going, cruz is not wasting any opportunity to hit donald trump. he did so today. he's been all over the state. he's been over in charleston and myrtle beach. we're headed over there right after we chat with you, and then he heads on to greenville. but i want you to listen to a little bit of what he had to say about trump's positions in the middle east. take a listen. >> just this week, donald trump said in a tv program, that he would be neutral between israel and the palestinians.
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so let me tell you this. as president, i have no intention of being neutral as president of the united states. >> and listen, you hear that crowd responding, when you go to cruz events like these, craig. although i was at one yesterday, where a young man was deciding between marco rubio and ted cruz, and that is the other big battle that we are watch welcine battle for second place. you look at the heightened intensity of attacks between the two. you're seeing the campaigns really go after each other. the rubio campaign coming out just a little bit and warning of potential dirty tricks by the cruz campaign on primary day. this is feed whing what the rub campaign has called a culture of dishonesty within the cruz campaign. and cruz firing back saying, rubio looks week by complaining about this kind of thing. they're focused, they say, on trying to get their organization to a place where they will be able to coalesce conservatives, especially jut state around ted
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cruz and south carolina, and then move on. because, craig, south carolina tomorrow, and we've got the nevada caucuses right after that. and a week later, we've got the march 1st contest. this is really like a sort of intense time for the republican primary. it's exciting, but there's a lot of questions marks about how this will turn out. >> it is very exciting, and yes, lots and lots of questions. halley, thank you there in downtown columbia. turning to marco rubio now, who is also, of course, traveling the state today from clemson in the northwest corn to hilton head island in the southeast where he just wrapped up an event. this is where our gabe gutierrez is standing by, following the campaign. >> reporter: hey, there, craig. good afternoon. we're here at the airport here in hilton head. and hallie was talking about that e-mail blast that the rubio campaign put out, warning of potential dirty tricks on the part of ted cruz's campaign. ted cruz's campaign fire back. but even logistics is turning into an issue in this campaign. the rubio camp just wrapped up here, got on this charter flight
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